2017 Fulbright College Field Guide

Welcome, Introduction & Resources


 

First Semester Course Schedule

Throughout the day, as you learn more, use the table below to plan out the classes you are interested in taking. Remember to include any labs required for courses and to pick at least a couple of alternates to have on hand in the registration room.

Course # Course Name Hours Alternate Course # Alternate Course Name Hours
ANTH 1013 Intro to Biological Anthropology 3 ASTR 2003 Survey of the Universe 3
ANTH 1011L Intro to Biological Anthropology Lab 1 ASTR 2001L Survey of the Universe Lab 1
           
           
           
           
           
           

[Section for notes in print version.]

Welcome Letter from Dean Shields

Welcome to the J. William Fulbright College of Arts & Sciences

Whatever your major will be, no matter what you are interested in studying, all of your core courses will come from Fulbright College-and we are so excited for you to join the Fulbright Family.

Consisting of 19 academic departments, the college offers degrees in the fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. Old Main is home to Fulbright College and for many, the most beloved symbol of higher education in Arkansas. When you walk through Old Main’s doors, you will be forging a new path into your Fulbright Future.

It doesn’t matter who you were or weren’t in high school, or who your family or friends say you are or aren’t. When you walk through those doors, you are the only one who gets to decide who you are, who you will become and what you will accomplish. This is your new start - and quite simply, your life will never be the same.

Here at Fulbright College, you are unlikely to find a more supportive, talented, intelligent and diverse group of people ready to help you succeed. Attending orientation, and reading this Field Guide now, are great places to start.

In these pages, you’ll find useful tips about navigating your first semester and beyond, and information about our degrees, majors and minors.

My personal hope for you is that you leave orientation feeling empowered and inspired, and that you consider the words of our namesake, Senator J. William Fulbright, which have also become the college’s mission:

I also hope you have fun during this time of intentional, wise wandering. And as always, remember that we will be with you every step of the way as you take your place in the Class of 2021!

Sincerely,


Todd Shields
Dean
J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences

Fulbright College Orientation Schedule

2-Day & Honors Orientation / 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

10:00 a.m. - Welcome to Fulbright College!

10:15 a.m. - Advising & Registration Session for Students

10:30 a.m. - Advising Session for Guests

12:00 p.m. - Lunch at Brough Dining Hall

1:00 p.m. - Career Session for Students and Guests, Advising Labs for Students, Music Major Info Session

1:30 p.m. - Breakout Sessions for Guests*

1-Day Orientation / 11:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

11:30 a.m. - Welcome to Fulbright College!

11:45 a.m. - Lunch at Brough Dining Hall

12:30 p.m. - Advising & Registration Session for Students

1:30 p.m. - Registration Session for Students

1:30 p.m. - Breakout Sessions for Guests*

*Breakout Sessions

Breakout Sessions showcase the many opportunities available at the University of Arkansas and are designed for parents and guests of students while students complete course registration. If the student completes registration early, they are welcome to attend Breakout Sessions as well.

See the New Student Orientation agenda for the description of the individual Breakout Sessions along with times offered.

Welcome Letter from Shane Barker

It’s great to see you here on campus as you join our Fulbright College family!

It’s time to start creating your future! In Fulbright College, we have high expectations. Our graduates are thoughtful decision-makers, transformational leaders, innovative researchers, and creative thinkers.

Every student wants a bright future with a good job and great salary. A Fulbright Future, however, is much more. Senator J. William Fulbright, our college namesake, dedicated his life to peace and education.

His ideas continue to influence millions of people across the globe. He was an educator, a leader, a philosopher, and a humanitarian. Most importantly, he developed and used his own abilities and ideas to positively influence as many people as he could. THAT is a Fulbright Future.

As Senator Fulbright said,

The Fulbright College Academic Advising Center (FCAC) is here to help you find your Fulbright Future. FCAC supports all undergraduate students within the Fulbright College in pursuit of timely graduation by creating student-advisor connections that are meaningful, educational, developmental and based on accurate information.

Our advisors work with you to co-create a comprehensive plan that maximizes your college experience and helps you achieve your life, career and academic goals.

We have been working so hard all year preparing for your orientation. The possibilities are endless as a Fulbright College student, and we hope you take full advantage of everything our college has to offer. If you have any questions, please reach out to me or another staff member from our center.

I hope you enjoy your time with us at New Student Orientation and leave feeling confident about your first semester, connected to our Fulbright College Advising Center and full of Fulbright College pride!

Sincerely,

 

Shane Barker, Ed.D.
Director of Advising
Fulbright College Advising Center

Welcome, Introduction & Resources


Welcome Letter fro Ro Di Brezzo

Welcome to the University of Arkansas community.

We take great pride in supporting our students, and as part of helping you succeed as you transition to college, we have created a course for you, UNIV 1001: University Perspectives: Destination Graduation.

University Perspectives is an innovative one-hour course that will help you transition to university life by introducing you to the rigors of the college classroom. In this course, you will explore how to apply critical thinking skills in situations inside and outside of the classroom, discover the role integrity plays in academics and beyond, learn about and explore globalization and diversity and how they impact your experiences, and how to take active responsibility for yourself to make your college journey a success. All of the topics you will explore in UNIV 1001 are relevant to things you will encounter on campus not only in your first year, but also in your upper-level courses.

Thanks to small class sizes, you will also form bonds with your fellow classmates and make connections with the exceptional faculty and staff members who teach the course. National studies show that students who enroll in classes like UNIV 1001 stay enrolled at the university, earn a higher GPA, and graduate at a higher rate than students who do not take such a course.

To get the most out of University Perspectives and your college experience, it is important that you purchase the course textbook, attend class, and be prepared to engage with your instructor and classmates. You have demonstrated that you are academically prepared to enroll at the university, but know that academic preparedness is not the only factor in your success, and we are here to help you along the way.

Welcome to the university, and we look forward to working with you and seeing your name on Senior Walk in a few years.

Sincerely,

Ro Di Brezzo, Ph.D.
Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Enhancement
Office for Faculty Development and Enhancement

AP & IB Credit

The Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) Programs give students the opportunity to pursue college-level studies while still in high school. By obtaining an appropriate score on an AP or IB exam, students will receive college credit upon entering the university.

If you have not received your AP or IB test results by the time you are registering for your courses, try to avoid registering for those courses that you may receive credit for.

To see minimum IB scores and the course possibilities, please visit our Registrar’s Office website at registrar.uark.edu and click on Test Credit.

You can have your AP scores sent to the university by visiting the College Board website at collegeboard.org. IB scores must be requested from International Baccalaureate North America, 200 Madison Avenue, Suite 2007, New York, NY 10016, telephone: 212-696-4464.

The table beginning below shows the minimum scores and credit/placement for each.

Symbols for placement and credit:

C = credit
Cq = qualified credit (placement and credit subject to departmental review)
E = exempt
P = placement
Pq
= qualified placement (student may be placed in an advanced course, with credit awarded for prerequisite courses upon satisfactory completion, subject to departmental review.)

* Students must pass a departmental test to receive credit.
** To receive credit for courses preceding the course for which AP credit has been granted, students must enroll in and complete with a grade of “C”or higher, that course which follows in sequence the course for which AP credit was granted.
*** At most, 3 hours credit allowed for AP Statistics.

Transitioning to the University


Concurrent Coursework / courseequivalency.uark.edu

Concurrent courses are typically offered from community colleges near the student’s high school. Students are enrolled in actual college courses that also fulfill requirements for their high school curriculum.

You will need to have a transcript from the community college sent to the Registrar’s Office to receive credit.

If your transcript has not arrived or has not been evaluated, try to avoid registering for those courses that you might receive credit for.

These courses are subject to the university’s transfer policies. You can review these polices on the Registrar’s Office website at registrar.uark.edu.

To determine your transfer course equivalency, go to fcac.uark.edu and click on Transfer Students.

Transitioning to the University


Freshman Composition Placement

Math Placement / fulbright.uark.edu/mathplacement

Placement into a math course can be accomplished by any one of the three ways:

Credit in the prerequisite course.

The UA Math Placement Test (UA MPT) process.

A sufficient ACT MATH or SAT MATH score.

If you need to take the UA MPT, you must start at the PALG and work your way forward. 

Transitioning to the University


Language Placement / fulbright.uark.edu/languageplacement

Students with previous language experience are encouraged to take language placement examinations offered online. Those test scores will be used by academic advisors to determine an appropriate language placement level. Students who omit one or more courses in the basic language sequence will receive credit for omitted courses when they have validated their high placement by passing the course into which they were placed with a “C” or better. To learn more about the language placement test, you can speak with a Fulbright College advisor during orientation, or you can call the Fulbright College Advising Center at (479) 575-3307.

Scholarship Guide / scholarships.uark.edu

Where noted, students must complete the minimum hour requirement by the end of the summer semester: thirty (30) hours after the first year of study, sixty (60) after the second, and ninety (90) after the third year. Five year programs, such as MAT and Architecture, allow students to go into a fifth year with their scholarship, students need to complete 120 hours their fourth year. Any hours over 30 in an academic year carry over for the next year’s renewal requirements.

If a student is put on Academic Probation at any time, their scholarship is automatically discontinued and can’t be reinstated until the student reaches renewal criteria and appeals with the Scholarship Review Committee. Once they meet renewal criteria, they need to meet with their scholarship advisor.

For renewal purposes, use only the GPA credits earned through attending the University of Arkansas or taking University of Arkansas Independent Study courses through Global Campus. This policy is related to the general university rule stating that grade points earned through transferred credit cannot be calculated into a student’s University of Arkansas grade point average.

Ways to Earn Credit Hours

  • AP and/or IB Courses
  • College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
  • U of A Testing Services Office - test.uark.edu
  • Concurrent credit enrollment through high school
  • Credit by transfer
  • Credit by correspondence
  • University of Arkansas Independent Study through Global Campus – sceao.uark.edu

Course Registration: Terms, Tips, & UAConnect

How to read a course description

Each academic course at the University of Arkansas begins with a four letter department code followed by a four digit number and sometimes a letter.

These details explain which department offers the course, the level of the course (first digit), how many credit hours you will earn by successfully completing the course (last digit) and if applicable, a suffix will identify the type of class it is (L for lab, C for a drill component which is similar to a lab, H for honors credit, M for honors laboratory).

  • ENGL 1013 (Composition I): Offered by the Department of English, a freshman level course worth three credit hours.
  • BIOL 1543/1541L (Principles of Biology lecture and the co-requisite Principles of Biology lab): Offered by the Department of Biological Sciences, both freshman level courses but the lecture is worth three credit hours and the lab is worth one credit hour.
  • PLSC 3103 (Intro to Public Administration): Offered by the Department of Political Science, a junior level course worth three credit hours.

Enrollment Status

To maintain full-time student status in a regular term, students must enroll in a minimum of 12 credit hours.

Because Fulbright College degree programs require a minimum of 120 semester hours, or 30 hours per year, a student should earn an average of 15 hours per semester to complete most degree programs in four years (eight semesters).

The maximum allowable hours per semester without permission from the Dean’s Office is 18 credit hours.

Scheduling factors to consider

When choosing classes for your first semester, always start with the classes that are specific to your major or a major you might be considering and fill in any additional needed hours with other University Core classes.

  • Everyone has different preferences on class times. Think about what works best for you, and be flexible with your schedule. Speak with your advisor if you have any questions.
  • Always take into account any academic scholarship you have received and the requirements of that particular scholarship. See the charts on the previous pages with general information regarding New freshman scholarships.
  • Any AP/IB/CLEP/Dual Credit or Concurrent Enrollment should be taken into account when selecting courses.
  • Do not enroll in courses you might have credit for from AP/IB exams or concurrent classes you haven’t yet submitted transcripts for.

UAConnect / uaconnect.uark.edu

Up until this point, you have probably been using UAConnect to check on your admissions status and register for orientation. Students use UAConnect for many other tasks including enrolling in classes, finding enrollment dates and times, checking grades, reviewing academic advisement reports, submitting payments to their student accounts and applying for graduation.

For additional help with UAConnect, visit their help page: help-uaconnect.uark.edu/help-centers/student.php.

Schedule Planner / registrar.uark.edu/registration/schedule-planner.php

Schedule Planner is a web-based class scheduling tool that is easy to use and will allow students to quickly build their schedule, taking into account their personal time requirements (work, athletics, leisure, etc.). Think of Schedule Planner as an “app” you use within UAConnect to help create schedules using specific classes. We will use Schedule Planner today in the registration portion of orientation.

When using Schedule Planner, students will be able to:

  • Set specific variables (Course Status, Term, Sessions, Campus Location) to narrow their search for the best potential schedule.
  • Create custom daily breaks for times they do not want to schedule classes.
  • Generate and view all possible combinations using the selected classes and break times.
  • Lock in particular class section(s) they prefer and re-generate only available schedules using the locked class section(s). The “lock in” feature does not guarantee the preferred section. Students must still enroll through UAConnect.
  • Directly import the selected schedule to their UAConnect shopping cart where final UAConnect enrollment procedures must be completed.

Academic Advising at Fulbright College / fcac.uark.edu

Fulbright College is full of opportunity, and in order to help you make the most out of your academic career, the Fulbright College Advising Center has two advising stages for you.

During your first year, you will attend four First Year Foundation Sessions lead by our team of first year advisors. In the Foundation Sessions, students will explore their identities, career goals, strategies for success, and classes in which they should enroll. The first three sessions will be focused around an advising assignment and the last session will be when you meet your college advisor. The goal of each advising assignment is to build a foundation of knowledge about the university and its resources, as well as to build your foundation for a graduation plan. By the end of your second semester you will have a plan of course work as well as additional activities to help you reach your next step after graduation, and you will have started working with your college advisor.

Foundation Session 1
Foundation Session 2
Foundation Session 3
Foundation Session 4

Beginning your sophomore year, or until you commit to a major, you will meet with your college advisor. A college advisor is an advisor who is specific to a student’s major, and will be with the student until graduation. College advisors assist students with staying on track to graduate, as well as with preparation for plans after graduation.

By offering both first year advising and college advising, the Fulbright College Advising Center works hard to equip students to make sound decisions that will lead you to the future you aspire to reach.

The First Year Foundation Sessions will help you thoughtfully explore your degree options and customize your Fulbright College experience to achieve your goals. Motivated students who want to fully engage in their majors, minors, and career community will use the Fulbright Futures Student Development Timeline beginning on the next page as a guide.

Fulbright Futures Student Development Timeline

New Student Orientation:

Learn about Fulbright College and Senator Fulbright’s legacy.

Explore Fulbright College’s career communities, majors and minors.

Meet some exemplary Fulbright College faculty, advisors and students.

Understand how your Fulbright College experience will empower you to achieve your academic and career goals.

Freshman Year:

  • Explore career communities in more detail.
  • In routine consultation with your Fulbright Foundation Advisor, thoroughly research the career communities, majors and minors that interest you.
  • Enjoy university core classes that will help you develop a basic competency in all of the skills listed earlier.
  • Attend meetings for student organizations related to your potential career community and major(s).
  • Declare the combination of career community, major(s) and minors that fits your goals by the end of your first year. Design a preliminary step-by-step plan that includes coursework and co-curricular activities to chart your own path to academic and career success!

Sophomore Year:

  • In routine consultation with your Fulbright College Advisor, continue to follow your graduation and career plan, adjusting when needed.
  • Introduce yourself to a faculty mentor within your major to begin discussing the most exciting things about the discipline and how you can make the most of your major.
  • Engage in foundational classes specific to your chosen major(s) and minor(s) and use these classes to enhance the skills most important to your career community.
  • Research occupations, employers and job postings within your career community — or begin to narrow down your list of potential graduate or professional programs, whichever is appropriate.
  • Visit with a career counselor or graduate school mentor familiar with your career community.
  • Connect with professionals in your career community.
  • Explore options for study abroad, undergraduate research, volunteer opportunities, student leadership and service learning that might fit your career community and major(s).
  • Officially join student organizations specific to your career community, major(s) and interests.
  • Explore a career fair or graduate school fair specific to your career community.
  • Begin honors/thesis project research by the end of the year.

Junior Year:

  • Maintain routine consultation with your College Advisor to make sure you continue to follow the plan in your graduation and career plan.
  • Continue to meet regularly with your faculty mentor to discuss the many opportunities related to your major, from upper-level coursework to internships, to research, to graduate schools.
  • Fulbright College Honors Program (FCHP) students should attend a thesis meeting in the fall or spring
  • FCHP students should ontinue research toward completion of your FCHP honors thesis. Submit your proposal in March.
  • Engage in advanced coursework within your major(s) and minor(s), fine-tuning those skills that are essential to your career community and personal goals.
  • Choose elective coursework that compliments your goals.
  • Meet often with a career counselor or graduate school mentor specific to your career community.
  • Consider leadership positions within the student organizations of which you are a member.
  • Take advantage of as many experiential learning opportunities related to your career community as you can, including internships, study abroad, service learning, volunteering, observation, part-time jobs, etc.
  • Attend a career fair specific to your career community to discuss the field with professionals or a graduate school fair to discuss admission criteria.
  • Focus on perfecting application skills for jobs or graduate school by utilizing mock interviews, resume reviews, developing letters of recommendation/references, personal statement or writing sample reviews and the application process itself.

Senior Year:

  • Apply for graduation in consultation with your college advisor.
  • Apply for employment opportunities or graduate schools posted within your career community with the support of your career counselor or graduate school mentor.
  • Meet often with your faculty mentor for general guidance during this crucial time.
  • Honors students should continue thesis/project research and maintain frequent contact with your thesis advisor
  • FCHP students should submit the required form for FCHP to complete the thesis process
  • Attend a career fair or graduate school fair specific to your career community to interact with employers or graduate schools to which you are applying.
  • Become a mentor to sophomores and juniors within your career community.

Graduation:

  • Participate in the Fulbright College Commencement Ceremony as you transition to a new phase and become a leader within our Fulbright Family!

Alumni:

  • As you progress in your career, stay connected to your Fulbright Family through your career community.
  • Consider being a mentor to Fulbright College students or speaking at an event related to your career community.
  • Never stop learning, developing and influencing the world in the spirit of Senator J. William Fulbright!

Transitioning to Graduate & Professional Schools


Program Selection & Research

Once you have chosen a field, the next challenge is selecting the individual programs to which you will apply. Most students choose between three and five programs. Choosing these programs by the end of your sophomore year will help guide your efforts. As you consider programs, think about some of the same factors you considered when you chose your undergraduate institution: location, type of school, faculty, size, specialty areas, etc. Don’t be afraid to visit with potential programs once you are ready!

Counseling / There are multiple graduate programs in every state. The University of Arkansas has an excellent program. Each individual program has its own admission criteria.

Dentistry / There are schools of dentistry in many states, however there is not currently a program in the state of Arkansas. Each individual program has its own admission criteria.

Medicine / There are schools of medicine in most states. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences has an excellent program. Each individual program has its own admission criteria.

Pharmacy / There are pharmacy programs in most states. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences has an excellent program. Each individual program has its own admission criteria.

Physical Therapy / There are multiple physical therapy programs in most states. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences has an excellent program. Each individual program has its own admission criteria.

Physician Assistant / There are physician assistant programs in most states. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences has an excellent program. Each individual program has its own admission criteria.

Occupational Therapy / There are multiple graduate programs in most states. Each individual program has its own admission criteria.

Optometry / There are 23 schools of optometry nationwide. Each individual program has its own admission criteria.

Education (MAT) / Most students interested in teaching grades 7 to 12 will apply to the Master of Arts in Teaching program at the University of Arkansas after completing their undergraduate degree.

Education (UATeach) / Students interested in teaching math or science have the option of completing the UATeach program and minor at the same time as their bachelor’s degree without attending graduate school.

Education (Art/Music) / Students interested in teaching art or music will complete their teacher education program by choosing the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Education or the Bachelor of Music in Music Education.

Law / There are multiple schools of law in most states. There are two within the University of Arkansas system - one at U of A Fayetteville and one at U of A Little Rock.

Social Work / Students interested in obtaining the advanced Master’s in Social Work (M.S.W.) licensure can do so in many states. Students who complete the Bachelor’s in Social Work (B.S.W.) degree can apply to the one year Advanced Standing M.S.W. program at the University of Arkansas.

Transitioning to Graduate & Professional Schools


Academic Requirements

Major Selection

Typically, graduate and professional schools do NOT require a specific major, nor is your major a part of their admissions formula. You may have to complete specific prerequisite courses (more detail about this in the next section), but those courses can be part of any degree plan. Consider things like your personal interests, career goals, and diversification of knowledge/skills when selecting your major.

Health / For all health-related programs, your major is your choice. Most programs prefer a variety of majors among their admitted students. Because Fulbright College degrees use built-in electives, you can make your prerequisites part of any major without adding any extra time or courses to your degree. Choose the major that is right for you.

Education / You must become an expert in your content area in order to teach it. Because of this, you should choose a major within your desired content/licensure area.

Law / No law program requires a specific undergraduate major. Law schools prefer a variety of majors among their admitted students. Choose the major that is right for you.

Social Work / All students who choose social work as a career should join the Bachelor of Social Work program.

Prerequisite Coursework & GPA

All graduate and professional programs are competitive, with GPA as a primary admissions factor. All students considering any type of graduate or professional program should aim for a minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA. Most programs require specific prerequisite courses as well. If this is the case, please note that each program may require a slightly different set of prerequisites, so know what is required. If you start early, you can plan these prerequisites into your other major and minor requirements. Oftentimes, graduate and professional programs will look at a separate GPA based only on those prerequisite courses, so your performance in those courses is especially important.

Counseling / Typically, counseling programs require specific undergraduate coursework. A 3.0 GPA is commonly the minimum required overall GPA, however the average of accepted applications may be closer to a 3.5 or higher.

Dentistry / Each program requires its own unique set of 20 to 30 hours of undergraduate coursework. Courses in biology, microbiology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and social sciences are common. It is imperative that you become familiar with the course requirements of EACH program to which you plan on applying. Work with your advisor to make these courses part of your degree.

Medicine / Each program requires its own unique set of 20 to 30 hours of undergraduate coursework. Courses in biology, microbiology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and social sciences are common. It is imperative that you become familiar with the course requirements of EACH program to which you plan on applying. Work with your advisor to make these courses part of your degree.

Pharmacy / Each program requires its own unique set of over 60 hours of undergraduate coursework. Courses in biology, microbiology, chemistry, organic chemistry, calculus, physics, social sciences and humanities are common. It is imperative that you become familiar with the course requirements of EACH program to which you plan on applying. Work with your advisor to make these courses part of your degree.

Physical Therapy / Each program requires its own unique set of 20 to 30 hours of undergraduate coursework. Courses in biology, human anatomy and physiology, chemistry, physics and social sciences are common. It is imperative that you become familiar with the course requirements of EACH program to which you plan on applying. Work with your advisor to make these courses part of your degree.

Physician Assistant / Each program requires its own unique set of 20 to 30 hours of undergraduate coursework. Courses in general biology, cell biology and genetics, human anatomy and physiology, chemistry, physics and social sciences are common. It is imperative that you become familiar with the course requirements of EACH program to which you plan on applying. Work with your advisor to make these courses part of your degree.

Occupational Therapy / Each program requires its own unique set of 20 to 30 hours of undergraduate coursework. Courses in biology, human anatomy and physiology, chemistry, physics and social sciences are common. It is imperative that you become familiar with the course requirements of EACH program to which you plan on applying. Work with your advisor to make these courses part of your degree.

Optometry / Each program requires its own unique set of 20 to 30 hours of undergraduate coursework. Courses in biology, microbiology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and social sciences are common. It is imperative that you become familiar with the course requirements of EACH program to which you plan on applying. Work with your advisor to make these courses part of your degree.

Education (all programs) / All education programs involve a long list of content and pedagogy courses. Students should become familiar with these courses as soon as possible. Work with your advisor to develop an appropriate course plan.

Law / Law schools do not typically require prerequisite courses. However, courses that emphasize advanced-level writing, reading, logic and critical thinking will better prepare you for legal education. These courses can be part of any degree plan.

Social Work / The Bachelor of Social Work contains all necessary courses for graduate school. The order in which these courses are taken are very important. Work with your advisor to develop an appropriate course plan.

Transitioning to Graduate & Professional Schools


Applying to Programs

Entrance Exams

All graduate and professional programs require some type of entrance exam. This exam will be specific to the field, and may test either your general knowledge or your knowledge within certain subjects. Know the exam for your field early so that you can be preparing for it throughout your undergraduate career.

Dentistry / DAT

Medicine / MCAT

Pharmacy / PCAT

Optometry / OAT

Education (MAT) / Praxis Series + GRE

Education (UATeach) / Praxis Series

Education (Art/Music) / Praxis Series + GRE

Law / LSAT

Counseling, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Occupational Therapy & Social Work / GRE

Experiential Learning, Shadowing & Observation

Learn by doing! One of the most important things you can do is to get out in the real world and get to know your potential profession. It is never too early to start shadowing on your own - most professionals are very eager to help students like you learn about the field. If you are interested in a professional program, there’s a good chance that observation hours are required, so be ready to meet (and exceed) those requirements with appropriate documentation.

Counseling, Dentistry, medicine & Pharmacy / Shadowing a practitioner and immersing yourself in the field will help you become a much more competitive applicant.

Physical Therapy / At least 40-60 hours of observation are typically mandatory admission requirements. Students should always aim for more than the minimum. Shadowing a practitioner and immersing yourself in the field will help you become a much more competitive applicant.

Physician Assistant / Pre-PA students are fundamentally different than any other group of pre-health students in that they must complete direct patient care hours. These are very different than observation or shadowing hours. Direct patient care hours must be spent directly influencing patient care. While some volunteer and entry-level work may meet this standard, students may need to obtain some type of license, such as a Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA) license to proceed. Furthermore, schools often require between 500 to 1,000 direct patient care hours. As you might imagine, this takes a considerable amount of planning. Students should meet with a pre-PA mentor to begin planning as soon as they can to meet this unique requirement.

Occupational Therapy / At least 40-60 hours of observation are typically mandatory admission requirements. Students should always aim for more than the minimum. Shadowing a practitioner and immersing yourself in the field will help you become a much more competitive applicant.

Optometry / Shadowing a practitioner and immersing yourself in the field will help you become a much more competitive applicant.

Education (all programs) / Observing and interacting with teachers on your own is important. Beyond that, your program will include plenty of real-world experience.

Law / The legal field is unique. Students should observe and interact with legal practitioners in a variety of settings throughout their undergraduate experience.

Social Work / A considerable amount of real world experience will be part of the Bachelor of Social Work curriculum. 

Personal Statement, Letters of Recommendation & Interviews

Most programs require 1) some type of written statement regarding your interest, abilities and knowledge specific to the field; 2) multiple letters of recommendation written by some combination of professors, advisors and professionals in the field; and 3) an interview with admissions officials. All of these requirements are aimed at judging your character and potential in the field. It is never too early to be improving in these areas. Make strong connections with faculty members and professionals. Always be looking to increase your knowledge of your field. Always be evolving in the areas of maturity, leadership, and “people skills” - the minimum is never good enough for a Fulbright College student.

Application Process & Website

Many fields have a central, national website through which you can apply to multiple programs. Become familiar with the application process at least a year before you plan to apply. Be able to answer the following questions: When does the application process begin? Which website is used to apply? When and how are applications reviewed? What is the specific admissions formula for each program? Is there an early application deadline? When do interviews begin? If accepted, when does the program begin?

Counseling / Consult individual program websites.

Dentistry / Associated American Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS.org)

Medicine / American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS at AAMS.org)

Pharmacy / Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS at AACP.org)

Physical Therapy / Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service (PTCAS.org)

Physician Assistant / Central Application Service for Physician Assistant (CASPAonline.org)

Occupational Therapy / Occupational Therapy Centralized Application Service (OTCAS at aota.org)

Optometry / Optometry Centralized Application Service (OptomCAS.org)

Education (all programs) / All students pursuing teacher licensure should apply at teacher-education.org during their SOPHOMORE year and then follow the application procedures specific to their program.

Law / Law School Admission Council (LSAC.org)

Social Work / The Bachelor of Social Work program involves an application process during the junior year. Students should consult with their advisor and socialwork.uark.edu for more information.

Transitioning to Graduate & Professional Schools


Extracurricular Opportunities

Student Clubs & Professional Organizations

Most fields have a corresponding student organization on campus (typically called a Registered Student Organization or RSO). These can be incredible resources as they offer a chance to learn about the field and to interact with other students. Also, all fields have at least one national professional organization. Look for that website to find lots of great information about your field.

Counseling / American Counseling Association at counseling.org is the national organization.

Dentistry / The U of A Pre-Dental Student Organization is on campus, and the American Dental Education Association at adea.org is the national organization.

Medicine / Alpha Epsilon Delta is the U of A Premedical Honors Society (national student organization with a
local chapter on campus), and the Association of American Medical Colleges at aamc.org is the national organization.

Pharmacy / The U of A Pre-Pharmacy Student Organization is on campus, and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy at aacp.org is the national organization.

Physical Therapy / The U of A Pre-Physical Therapy Student Organization is on campus, and the American Physical Therapy Association at apta.org is the national organization.

Physician Assistant / The U of A Pre-Physician Assistant Society Student Organization is on campus, and the Physician Assistant Education Association at paeaonline.org is the national organization.

Occupational Therapy / The U of A Pre-Occupational Therapy Student Organization is on campus, and the American Occupational Therapy Association at aota.org is the national organization.

Optometry / The U of A Pre-Optometry Student Organization is on campus, and the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry at opted.org is the national organization.

Law / The U of A Pre-Law Society Student Organization is on campus, and the Law School Admission Council at
lsac.org and the American Bar Association at americanbar.org are both very useful national organizations.

Social Work / Social Work Action Group (SWAG) is the on campus registered student organization, and Phi Alpha and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI at nami.org) are the national organizations.

Mentorship

Fulbright College has a faculty or staff member that serves as a mentor in your field, so take advantage of this opportunity. This type of mentorship is essential if you want to develop the most competitive application possible.

Dentistry / After meeting with a Fulbright College advisor, consult with Jerry Rose, Ph.D. in the Anthropology Department for pre-dental mentorship.

Medicine / After meeting with a Fulbright College Advisor, consult with one of two faculty mentors as part of the Liebolt Premedical Program for pre-medical mentorship.

Pharmacy / After meeting with a Fulbright College Advisor, consult with Lorraine Brewer, instructor in the Chemistry & Biochemistry Department for pre-pharmacy mentorship.

Physical Therapy / After meeting with a Fulbright College Advisor, consult with Shane Barker, Ed.D. in the Fulbright College Advising Center for pre-physical therapy mentorship.

Physician Assistant / After meeting with a Fulbright College Advisor, consult with Shane Barker, Ed.D. in the Fulbright College Advising Center for pre-physician assistant mentorship.

Occupational Therapy / After meeting with a Fulbright College Advisor, consult with Shane Barker, Ed.D. in the Fulbright College Advising Center for pre-occupational therapy mentorship.

Optometry / After meeting with a Fulbright College Advisor, consult with Shane Barker, Ed.D. in the Fulbright College Advising Center for pre-optometry mentorship.

Education (MAT) / Meet with your Fulbright College Advisor for both academic advising and pre-education mentorship.

Education (UATeach) / Meet first with your Fulbright College Advisor, and then consult a faculty member in the UATeach program for UATeach mentorship.

Education (Art/Music) / Meet with Donna Smith, M.F.A., in the Fulbright College Advising Center for both academic advising and mentorship.

Social Work / Meet with your Fulbright College Advisor, and then consult a faculty member for mentorship. Also, be aware of M.S.W. Information Sessions presented by the School of Social Work every semester.

Transitioning to Graduate & Professional Schools


Undergraduate Research & Study Abroad

Fulbright College is overflowing with research and study abroad opportunities - don’t miss out! For many fields, undergraduate research is essential. And for any field, study abroad is always a good idea.

Fulbright College Degrees, Majors & Minors


Terms

In Fulbright College, nothing is one-size-fits-all. You are here to create the future that is right for you. For this reason, a Fulbright College bachelor’s degree has many parts for you to choose from to make sure that it is just the right fit.

University Core

All students are required to complete core requirements regardless of their degree. The purpose of the core is to ensure that all students build on a common foundation of knowledge that includes a broad array of disciplines. The core includes 35 credit hours.

Degree

Fulbright College offers five different types of bachelor’s degrees. Each type of degree has its own outlook and purpose, and each offers a unique set of possible majors. All Fulbright College bachelor’s degrees include 120 credit hours.

Majors

Every student must choose at least one major. Your options will depend on the type of degree you have chosen. For example, the Bachelor of Arts offers over 20 possible majors whereas the Bachelor of Social Work only offers one major. Many students choose to double or triple major by choosing more than one major within their degree. Fulbright College majors vary from 30 to 60 credit hours each.

Minors

Any student can choose to do any minor regardless of which degree and major(s) they have chosen. A minor provides a good overview of a particular discipline, but does not involve as much detail as a major. Fulbright College minors require between 15 and 24 credit hours.

Elective Courses

Elective hours should be chosen very carefully as they are an important part of your degree. Students should choose electives that help them reach their goals (grad school prerequisites, career goals, personal enrichment, etc.)

All of our Fulbright College degrees have elective hours built in. The purpose of these hours is to allow students to customize their degree to fit their goals. Elective hours are the additional hours needed on top of core and major requirements to complete the required 120 credit hour minimum. If a student selects only one major and no minors, then that student will need a large number of elective hours. If a student selects two majors plus a minor, then that student may only need a very small number of elective hours.

Fulbright College Degrees, Majors & Minors


Areas of Study

 Major Minor or Dependent Major Area of Study Major Minor or Dependent Major Area of Study
   X  African and African American Studies    X Historic Preservation
 X X  Anthropology  X  X History
   X  Arabic    X Indigenous Studies
 X    Art Education  X   Interdisciplinary Studies
 X  X  Art History  X   International Studies
 X   Art Studio
Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture
   X Jewish Studies
   X Asian Studies  X  X Journalism
Advertising/Public Relations, Broadcast, News/Editorial, Journalism and English, Journalism and Political Science
 X  X Biology    X Latin American and Latino Studies
 X  X Chemistry
BioChemistry, BioPhysics, Chemistry
   X Legal Studies
   X Child Advocacy Studies   X  X Mathematical Sciences
Applied, Pure, Statistics
X   X Classical Studies     X
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
 X  X Communication     X Middle East Studies
 X  X Criminal Justice   X  X Music
   X Earth Science   X  X Philosophy
 X  X Economics  X  X Physics
Astronomy, Biophysics, Computational, Electronics, Geophysics, Optics, Professional
 X  X Economics/Int'l Business  X  X Political Science
 X  X English  X  X Psychology
 X  X English/Creative Writing    X Urban Planning
   X European Studies    X Religious Studies
 X  X French  X  X Social Work
   X Gender Studies X   X Sociology
 X  X Geography
Cartography/Remote Sensing/GIS
   X Southern Studies
 X  X Geology X   X Spanish
 X   Geophysics    X Statistics
 X  X German  X  X Theatre
 X   Graphic Design      

Fulbright College Degrees, Majors & Minors


The University Core

In order to prepare its students for lives of the highest individual quality and the greatest potential contribution to the making of a better world, the University of Arkansas has developed a comprehensive program of general education. Although the basic skills, knowledge, methodologies and judgments derived from experience in the core area set forth here may provide the basis for a major or professional concentration, the aims of these core requirements are not career specific. Rather, the following areas are designed to develop the tools for critical thinking and effective communication, an understanding of our richly diverse human heritage, the flexibility to adapt successfully to a rapidly changing world, a capacity for lifelong learning and an enthusiasm for creativity. See the opposite page for a full list of courses that apply for each area of study.

English/Communication (6 hours)

Courses offered in this area are designed to develop the ability to organize ideas and to communicate them in grammatically correct written English with clarity, precision and syntactical maturity. Freshman English courses taken at other universities will satisfy this requirement only if they are courses in composition.

Fine Arts/Humanities (6 hours)

Courses presented in this area are drawn from the study of human thought, emotion, values, culture and aesthetics. They are designed to develop the capacity for reflection, an appreciation of our own diverse culture and a tolerance of those foreign to us, and a heightened aesthetic and ethical sensibility. The courses are not performance-based, but offer students a basis for the gradual acquisition of broad cultural literacy.

Mathematics (3 hours)

Courses offered in this area are designed to develop the student’s ability to understand the diverse mathematical concepts that shape our increasingly technical culture. Core mathematics courses presuppose the ability to apply mathematical techniques at the level of high school algebra and geometry. The specific course(s) selected will depend upon each student’s curriculum, but no course below college algebra may be used to fulfill core requirements.

Natural Science (8 hours)

A primary goal of these courses is to develop an appreciation of the basic principles that govern natural phenomena and the role of experiment and observation in revealing these principles. Students should acquire an understanding of the relationship between hypothesis, experiment, and theory, and develop the skills common to scientific inquiry, including the ability to frame hypotheses and defend conclusions based on the analysis of data. These courses are designed to prepare a student for informed citizenship by illustrating the importance of science and technology to the present and future quality of life, and to the ethical questions raised by scientific and technological advances.

Please note that all majors associated with a Bachelor of Science degree (anthropology, biology, chemistry, geology, earth science, mathematics and physics) dictate which of the natural science core courses should be taken (consult the appropriate section below).

Social Science (9 hours)

The purpose of the social science core is to introduce students to the breadth of inquiry in the social sciences—such as the study of ideas, the behavior of individuals, groups, institutions and their interactions. The core should expose students to the history of and the challenges encountered in our complex, culturally diverse world.

American History and Civil Government (3 hours)

Under Arkansas law, no undergraduate degree may be granted to any student who has not passed a college course in American history and civil government.

Fulbright College Degrees, Majors & Minors


The Fulbright College Honors Program

Looking for more rigorous and unique courses to compliment your educational goals? Then consider the Fulbright College Honors Program.

During the fall semester of 1954, Dean D.G. Nichols appointed a faculty committee to consider how our college might offer additional educational opportunities for “superior students.” Events moved quickly, and the first students entered the newly formed honors program in the fall of 1955. By May 1956, two students graduated from what would become the Fulbright College Honors Program, and since that time our program has taken its place as one of the oldest and most distinguished honors programs in the country.

Building on its early reputation for academic excellence, the Fulbright College Honors Program has continued to develop an innovative curriculum that provides our students with the extra attention and preparation required to succeed in the rapidly changing world that awaits them upon graduation. From the NEH-funded Honors Humanities Project, which offers students a broad grounding in humanities and the arts, to the tightly focused, small-group learning experiences of the honors colloquia, students who complete their degrees with honors are regularly admitted to the most prestigious professional and graduate schools both in our country and abroad.

Our growth and commitment to excellence was accelerated exponentially in April of 2002 when the University of Arkansas received over $100 million from the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation to establish a university-wide Honors College. Not only did the gift attract talented students from around the country, it also provided study-abroad funding that, when combined with our own program’s Sturgis Study Abroad scholarships, allowed us to send more students abroad than we had ever dreamed—a dream entirely in keeping with one of the lifelong passions of our namesake, Senator J. William Fulbright. 

So, whether our students’ goals include world-travel and language acquisition or a place in a campus laboratory whose research is having world-wide implications—or both!—the Fulbright College Honors Program will develop and sharpen their passions into the professional package that will allow them to take the next step in their careers.

Fulbright College Honors Bachelor of Arts Core

All Fulbright College Honors students earning a B.A. as a fundamental component of their honors education will complete the core requirements on page 31 in place of the standard University Core.

Fulbright College Honors Bachelor of Science Core

All Fulbright College Honors students earning a B.S. as a fundamental component of their honors education will complete the core requirements on page 32 in place of the standard University Core.

Fulbright College Honors Bachelor of Music Core

All Fulbright College Honors students earning a B.M. as a fundamental component of their honors education will complete the core requirements on page 33 in place of the standard University Core.

Fulbright College Honors Bachelor of Fine Arts Core

All Fulbright College Honors students earning a B.F.A. as a fundamental component of their honors education will complete the core requirements on page 34 in place of the standard University Core.

Fulbright College Degrees, Majors & Minors


Degrees in the Fulbright College


Bachelor of Arts Degrees (B.A.)

B.A. in Anthropology

The interdisciplinary study of humanity from biological, cultural and archaeological perspectives.

Anthropology is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Anthropology.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

ANTH 1023 Intro to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1013/1011L Intro to Biological Anthropology
ANTH 1033 Intro to Archeology

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

ANTH 3163 Male and Female: A Cultural and Biological Overview
ANTH 3433 Human Evolution
ANTH 3033 Egyptology

B.A. in Communication

As a subject for academic study, communication bridges the humanities and the social sciences. It focuses on relationships—personal, group and societal—and the factors and processes which affect those important relationships. Friendships and families, business relationships and political systems, cultural interaction and technological advances all are important areas of study in communication.

Communication is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Communication.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

COMM 1023 Communication in a Diverse World
COMM 1233 Media, Communication, and Citizenship
COMM 1313 Public Speaking
COMM 1003 Film Lecture

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

COMM 3703 Organizational Communication
COMM 3373 Leadership Communication
COMM 3883: Rhetoric of Social Movements
COMM 3433 Family Communication
COMM 3383 Persuasion
COMM 3763 Health Communication
COMM 4883: Seminar in Media

 

B.A. in Classical Studies

The Classical Studies major involves the study of the classical world of ancient Greece and Rome through an interdepartmental lens, including language, history, philosophy, literature, architecture, and art history. This field involves study in the classic liberal arts fields.

Classical Studies is offered both as a major and a minor by the Department of World Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

GREK or LATN 1003 (students considering graduate school in the Classics should consider studying both Greek and Latin)
CLST 1003 Introduction to Classical Studies: Greece
CLST 1013 Introduction to Classical Studies: Rome
PHIL 2003 Introduction to Philosophy
WLIT 1113 World Literature I
HIST 1113 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations I
HIST 1123 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations II

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

CLST 4003H Classical Studies Colloquium
HIST 4003 Democratic Athens
ARHS 4833 Ancient Art
Advanced Ancient Greek or Latin

B.A. in Criminal Justice

The system of practices and institutions of governments directed at upholding social control, deterring and mitigating crime, or sanctioning those who violate laws with criminal penalties and rehabilitation efforts.

Criminal Justice is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

SOCI 2013 General Sociology
CMJS 2003 Introduction to Criminal Justice
CMJS 2043 Criminal Law and Society

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

CMJS 3023 Criminology
CMJS 3203 Corrections
CMJS 3043 Police and Society

B.A. in Economics/International Economics & Business

Both a social science and a business field, it can be argued that economics has evolved from a ‘discipline’ to an ‘approach’ used to study behavior with regards to the use of scarce resources.

Economics is offered as both a major and a minor. Economics with a concentration in International Economics and Business is offered as a major. All of these programs are offered by the Department of Economics as a partnership between the Fulbright College and the Walton College of Business.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

MATH 1203/4 College Algebra (Prerequisite for ECON 2013/2023)
ECON 2013 Principles of Macroeconomic Theory
ECON 2023 Principles of Microeconomic Theory

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

ECON 3533 Labor Economics
ECON 4033 History of Economic Thought
ECON 4423 Behavioral Economics
ECON 4633 International Trade
ECON 4743 Intro to Econometrics
ECON 4753 Forecasting

B.A. in English

The study of literatures written in English, as well as the opportunity to develop skills in creative and expository writing. A rich variety of courses are offered, and there is opportunity within the major for students to explore areas of special interest like American literature, the Renaissance, drama, the English language and modern and contemporary literature.

English is offered as a major and a minor. English with a concentration in Creative Writing is offered as a major. Each of these programs is offered by the Department of English.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

ENGL 1013 Composition I
ENGL 1023 Composition II
WLIT 1113 World Literature I
WLIT 1123 World Literature II

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

ENGL 4303 Intro to Shakespeare
ENGL 4013 Poetry Workshop
ENGL 4023 Fiction Workshop

See World Languages.

B.A. in Geography

The study of the physical features of the earth and its atmosphere, and of human activity as it affects and is effected by these, including the distribution of populations and resources, land use and industries.

Geography is offered as a major and a minor by the Department of Geosciences.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

GEOS 1123 Human Geography
GEOS 1113/1111L General Geology
GEOS 2003 World Regional Geography
GEOS 1133/1131L Earth Science

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

GEOS 3023 Introduction to Cartography
GEOS 3543 Geospatial Applications and Information Science
GEOS 3333 Oceanography
GEOS 3043 Sustaining Earth
GEOS 4243 Political Geography
GEOS 4363 Climatology
GEOS 4383 Hazard & Disaster Assessment

See World Languages.

B.A. in History

The study of the past, with emphasis on both official records and vernacular accounts from those rendered voiceless.

History is offered as a major and a minor by the Department of History.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

HIST 1113 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations I 
HIST 1123 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations II
HIST 2003 History of the American People to 1877 
HIST 2013 History of the American People 1877 to Present
World Language at the appropriate level (see page 11 for placement guidelines)

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

HIST 3033 Islamic Civilization
HIST 3233 African American History to 1877
HIST 4133 Society and Gender in Modern Europe

B.A. in International Studies

The International Studies major involves the study of global issues through an interdepartmental lens, including language, economics, geography, political science, mathematics and history. The goal of the field is to gain cultural competency and international experience while encouraging big picture thinking about the world.

International Studies is offered as a major and is an interdisciplinary program.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

CHIN, FREN, GERM, ITAL, JAPN, or SPAN 1003 OR ARAB 1016 (or higher level based on placement test or previous credit)
HIST 1123 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations II 
INST 2013 Introduction to International Studies (taken second semester)
ECON 2143 Basic Economics: Theory and Practice 
PLSC 2813 Introduction to International Relations

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

Advanced Language Courses
INST 4003 International Studies Seminar
GEOS 4243 Political Geography
PLSC 4803 Foreign Policy Analysis
HIST 4773 Diplomatic History of the United States 1945-Present
MATH or Statistics at the 2000 level

B.A. in Journalism

The study of journalism with an emphasis in writing for newspapers, magazines and websites.

The Department of Journalism offers a major in Journalism with a Broadcast Journalism Concentration, a major in Journalism with an Advertising/PR Concentration, a major in Journalism with a News/Editorial Journalism Concentration and a minor in Journalism. Students can also seek a combined major in English and Journalism, as well as Journalism and Political Science.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

JOUR 1023 Media and Society 
JOUR 1033 Fundamentals of Journalism

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

Broadcast Journalism Concentration:

JOUR 4863 TV News Reporting I
JOUR 4033 Advanced Radio News Reporting
JOUR 3453 Sports TV Production II

News and Editorial Journalism Concentration:

JOUR 3123 Feature Writing
JOUR 3083 Photojournalism II
JOUR 4553 Magazine Editing and Production I

Advertising and Public Relations Concentration:

JOUR 4143 Public Relations Writing
JOUR 4453 Media Planning 
JOUR 4423 Creative Strategy

B.A. in Philosophy

The study of the deepest and most challenging questions that the human mind can raise. For example: What is the difference between appearance and reality? What are the sources and limits of human knowledge? What is the origin of evil? Do we have freedom of will? What is truth? What is the meaning of a word?

Philosophy is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Philosophy.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

PHIL 2003 Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 2103 Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 2203 Logic

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

PHIL 4013 Platonism & Origin of Christian Theology
PHIL 4023 Medieval Philosophy
PHIL 4073 History of Analytic Philosophy
PHIL 4183 Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason

B.A. in Political Science

Provides an understanding and explanation of politics and governance systems, public policies and political behavior in domestic and international settings.

Political Science is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Political Science.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

PLSC 2003 American National Government
PLSC 2013 Introduction to Comparative Politics
PLSC 2813 Introduction to International Relations

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

PLSC 3153 Public Policy or PLSC 3103 Public Administration
PLSC 3203 Introduction to Legal Studies
PLSC 300V Internship in Political Science
PLSC 3253 Urban Politics
PLSC 4513 Creating Democracies

B.A. in Psychology

The study of human behavior and mental processes with an emphasis in research methods and exposure to abnormal, social, developmental and cognitive areas.

Psychology is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Psychological Science.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

PSYC 2003 General Psychology 
MATH 1203 College Algebra
Math Option: MATH 2043 Survey of Calculus, MATH 2053 Finite Mathematics, or MATH 2554 Calculus I.

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

PSYC 3023 Abnormal Psychology
PSYC 3013 Social Psychology 
PSYC 4063 Psychology of Personality 
PSYC 4183 Behavioral Neuroscience

B.A. in Sociology

The scientific study of social behavior or society, including its origins, development, organization, networks and institutions.

Sociology is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

SOCI 2013 General Sociology

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

SOCI 3193 Race, Class, and Gender
SOCI 3313 Social Research

B.A. in Theatre

Theatre majors include actors, directors, designers and playwrights from widely varied backgrounds with one thing in common: the desire to make great theatre. They are determined to use their study of theatre to grow as individuals, and to use their individuality - the process of exploring who they are - to grow as theatre artists.

Theatre is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Theatre.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

THTR 1883 Acting I for Theatre Majors
THTR 1223 Introduction to Theatre
THTR 1313/1311L Stage Technology I: Costumes and Makeup and Lab
THTR 1323/1321L Stage Technology II: Scenery and Lighting and Lab

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

THTR 3653 Directing I
THTR 3683 Stage Management I
THTR 4953 Theatre Study in Britain

B.A. in World Languages

The study of language forms, meanings and contexts.

World Languages offer majors in French, German and Spanish. The department also offers minors in Arabic (with a optional business concentration), Chinese with business orientation, French (with an optional business concentration), German (with an optional business concentration), Italian (with an optional business concentration), Japanese (with a business concentration), and Spanish (with an optional business concentration). Each of these programs is offered by the Department of World Languages.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

Elementary/Intermediate language courses: 1003, 1013, 2003 and 2013 - students will begin language study at differing levels depending on their background.

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

FREN, GERM, or SPAN 3103 Cultural Readings 
FREN, or SPAN 3113, or GERM 3013 Introduction to Literature


Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

B.S. in Anthropology

The interdisciplinary study of humanity from biological, cultural and archaeological perspectives.

Anthropology is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Anthropology.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

ANTH 1023 Intro to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1013/1011L Intro to Biological Anthropology
ANTH 1033 Intro to Archeology

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

ANTH 3163 Male and Female: A Cultural and Biological Overview
ANTH 3433 Human Evolution
ANTH 4523 Dental Science
ANTH 3533 Medical Anthropology

B.S. in Biology

The study of life and living organisms, including their structure, function, growth, evolution, distribution and taxonomy.

Biology is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Biological Sciences.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

CHEM 1103/1101L University Chemistry I
CHEM 1123/1121L University Chemistry II
BIOL 1584 Biology for Majors 
MATH 1203 College Algebra (or higher)

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

BIOL 3863 General Ecology
BIOL 4563 Cancer Biology
BIOL 4713 Basic Immunology
BIOL 4753 Virology
BIOL 4153/4252 Biology of Global Change
BIOL 4234 Comparative Physiology 
BIOL 3023 Evolutionary Biology

B.S. in Chemistry and Biochemistry

The study of the composition, structure, properties and change of matter.

Chemistry is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers majors in chemistry in the following concentrations: Chemistry, Biophysical and Biochemistry.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

CHEM 1213/1211L Chemistry for Majors I and Lab
CHEM 1223/1221L Chemistry for Majors II and Lab 
BIOL 1543/1541L Principles of Biology (for biochemistry majors)
or
CHEM 1103/1101L University Chemistry I and Lab
CHEM 1123/1121L University Chemistry II and Lab
MATH 2554 Calculus I

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

CHEM 3813 Introduction to Biochemistry 
CHEM 400v Chemistry Research
CHEM 4153L Nanotechnology Laboratory 
CHEM 4123 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 4723 Experimental Methods in Organic Chemistry
CHEM 4213/4211L Instrumental Analysis

B.S. in Geology

The study of the earth’s physical structure and substance, its history and the processes that act on it.

Geology is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Geosciences.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

GEOS 1113/1111L General Geology
GEOS 1133/1131L Earth Science
MATH 2554 Calculus I
CHEM 1103/1101L University Chemistry I

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

GEOS 2313 Mineralogy and Petrology 
GEOS 3413 Sedimentary Rocks and Fossils
GEOS 3514 Structural Geology
GEOS 4153 Karst Hydrogeology
GEOS 4533 Petroleum Geophysics
GEOS 4686 Geology Field Camp

B.S. in Mathematics

The study of numbers, equations, functions, and geometric shapes and their relationships.

Mathematics is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Mathematics.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

Prerequisites: Depending on the student’s math background, math prerequisites may include MATH 1203/4 College Algebra and MATH 1284 Precalculus. 
MATH 2554 Calculus I
MATH 2564 Calculus II
MATH 2574 Calculus III

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

MATH 3093 Abstract Linear Algebra
MATH 4363 Numerical Analysis
STAT 3013 Intro to Probability and Statistics
MATH 4443 Complex Variable for Application
MATH 4513 Advanced Calculus I
MATH 4933 Mathematics Major Seminar

B.S. in Physics

The natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion through space and time, along with related concepts such as energy and force. One of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, the main goal of physics is to understand how the universe behaves.

Physics is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Physics.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

MATH 2554C Calculus I
MATH 2554C Calculus II
PHYS 2054 University Physics I
PHYS 2074 University Physics II
CHEM 1103/1101L University Chemistry I or CSCE 2004 Programming Foundations I
CHEM 1123/1121L University Chemistry II or CSCE 2014 Programming Foundations II

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

PHYS 3414 Electromagnetic Theory
PHYS 3544 Optics
PHYS 3613 Modern Physics
PHYS 4073 Intro to Quantum Mechanics
PHYS 4333 Thermal Physics
PHYS 4734 Intro to Laser Physics


Bachelor of Fine Arts Degrees (B.F.A.)

B.F.A. in Art

The study of fine arts ranging from creative thinking, to drawing, to video and other media.

The School of Art offers degrees in Art with a Concentration in Studio Art, and a B.F.A. in Art with a Concentration in Art Education are both offered by the School of Art.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

ARTS 1919C Studio Foundations I
ARTS 1929C Studio Foundations II

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

Concentration in Studio Art

ARHS 4933 Contemporary Art
ARTS 4923 Professional Development
PHIL 4403 Philosophy of Art

Concentration in Art Education

ARHS 4933 Contemporary Art
ARTS 4923 Professional Development
CIED 3033 Classroom Learning Theory
ARED 3653 Teaching Art in Secondary Schools

B.F.A. in Graphic Design

The degree prepares students to be proficient makers and thoughtful problem seekers and solvers. Students will work seamlessly across a range of media, working to identify appropriate solutions for audience and context.

Graphic Design is offered as a major by the School of Art.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

ARTS 1919C Studio Foundations I
ARTS 1929C Studio Foundations II

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

ARTS 4323 Interactive Language
ARTS 4343 Identity Systems
ARTS 4353 Human Centered Design


Bachelor of Music Degrees (B.M.)

B.M. in Music Education

Multidisciplinary approach to academic and professional training in performance, music education, composition, music history, music theory, ethnomusicology and music business.

Music is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Music. The B.M. in Music Education is offered in the following concentrations: Choral Emphasis, Piano Major; Choral Emphasis, Voice Major; Instrumental, String Major; and Instrumental, WW/Brass/Percussion Major.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

MUTH 1003 Basic Musicianship
MUAP 110V Applied Music Lessons

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

MUHS 4523 Special Topics in Music History
MUAC 4371 Teaching the High School Percussionist
MUSY 2003 Music in World Cultures

B.M. in a Performance Concentration

Multidisciplinary approach to academic and professional training in performance, music education, composition, music history, music theory, ethnomusicology and music business.

Music is offered as both a major and a minor by the Department of Music. The B.M. is offered in the following concentrations: Guitar Performance; Piano Performance; String Performance; Music Theory; Voice Performance; and Woodwind, Brass, or Percussion Performance.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

MUTH 1003 Basic Musicianship
MUAP 110V Applied Music Lessons

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

MUHS 4523 Special Topics in Music History

Additional Degree Options

Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.)

The mission of the School of Social Work is to improve the lives of vulnerable persons, families, groups, organizations and communities, especially those in economic risk.

Social Work is offered as both a major and a minor by the School of Social Work.

Coursework:

These courses provide a foundation for the major and are best completed during your freshman year or after declaring the major:

COMM 1313 Public Speaking
ENGL 1013 English Composition I
PLSC 2003 American National Government
PSYC 2003 General Psychology
SOCI 2013 General Sociology
SCWK 2133 Introduction to Social Work
SCWK 3193 Human Diversity and Social Work

These courses provide a great example of the kinds of courses you might take as a junior or senior in this major:

SCWK 4093 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
SCWK 4153 Social Welfare Policy

Bachelor of Arts in a Natural Science or Fine Arts

After your freshman year, you may decide you would like to major in a natural science or fine arts, but need more flexibility than your current degree may offer. For this purpose, the Bachelor of Arts degree is also offered with a major in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, art or music. The B.A. is not the traditional degree for these fields, so the decision to complete a B.A. in a natural science or fine arts should only happen after close consultation with your academic advisor.

Interdisciplinary Programs

Interdisciplinary programs involve the study of one issue, idea, or theme using multiple perspectives, disciplines and sources to encourage big-picture thinking. Talk with your academic advisor to learn more. These majors typically involve a highly-customized plan of study and advanced-level language. Please consult with an advisor as soon as possible if you are interested in one of these programs:

African and African American Studies
Asian Studies
Classical Studies
European Studies
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Latin American and Latino Studies
Middle East Studies

Useful Terminology


 

Useful Terminology

Academic Advisor
A student’s academic advisor helps the student develop an academic plan leading to graduation. This plan is developmental and includes choosing the appropriate classes, meeting core and major requirements and planning for a future career.

Academic Calendar
A calendar of dates showing when fall, spring and summer terms begin and end as well as other related dates, such as finals week and commencement.

Academic Dismissal
A student on academic suspension who does not earn a term GPA (see grade point average) of 2.0 will be dismissed from the university and unable to return except through appeal to the Academic Standards Committee.

Academic Honesty
The University’s Code of Academic Integrity emphasizes that a student’s work must be his or her own.

Academic Load
A full–time load of classes totals 12 or more credit hours during the fall and spring terms and 6–7 credit hours during a summer term.

Academic Status
A combination of term and cumulative grade point averages determines a student’s academic “health” – whether he or she is in good shape academically, under a warning status, suspended from full–time enrollment, or dismissed from the university.

Academic Suspension
A student on academic warning who does not earn the minimum required grade point average will have to choose between a year’s academic leave from the university or a limitation of taking 9 credit hours.

Academic Warning
A student whose semester grade point average falls below what is required for good status will be placed on academic warning and limited to 12 credit hours the next semester.

Academic Year
An academic year consists of the fall and spring semesters/terms plus the summer terms.

Blackboard
The online course management system used at the U of A. Instructors upload course materials which students can read and respond to online.

CAPS
Short for Counseling and Psychological Services, which are offered through the Pat Walker Health Center.

Career Communities
A unique way for students to build skills that complement their academic and career pursuits by customizing their Fulbright College experience to achieve their desired goals.

Career Development Center
Provides resources, both in–person and Online, to help students choose majors and careers, write resumes and cover letters, find jobs and the like.

Catalog of Studies
Online comprehensive reference tool listing degrees and courses offered at the U of A as well as additional information about costs, financial assistance and campus resources.

Center for Educational Access
Central campus resource for students with disabilities to obtain accommodations needed for equal access to education.

Chair of a Department
Administrative head of an instructional unit.

Chancellor
Chief Executive Officer and leader of the university.

Code of Student Life
Outline of student responsibilities on and off campus and a description of disciplinary processes and sanctions should students not accept and practice these responsibilities.

College
An undergraduate division of a university offering courses and degrees; the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences is one of six academic colleges at the University of Arkansas.

Concentration
A particular emphasis within a major designed to focus coursework toward a specific field. For example, biochemistry within the chemistry major.

Co-requisite
A course that must be taken at the same time as another course.

Course Number
A number combination that follows a course name and indicates the level of the course and the number of credit hours the course carries. For example, English 1013 is a freshman–level course (101) and carries three hours of credit (3).

Credit Hour
College courses are usually measured in credit hours with one credit hour equal to 15 clock hours a semester. A three–credit hour class, therefore, would involve 45 clock hours of instruction either online or in a classroom.

Curriculum
A program of courses approved for a particular degree. To earn a degree in a particular program, a student must complete the curriculum for that program.

Dead Day
The day between the end of the term and the beginning of the final examination period. Called “Reading Day” at some colleges, this day without either classes or exams is used as a time to finish up course papers or prepare for final tests.

Dean
The administrative head of a college or unit; Todd Shields is the dean of the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

Dean's List
An honor roll published at the end of each semester. The Dean’s List includes students who achieve a 3.75 to 3.99 GPA in at least 12 semester hours normally required by their college for graduation.

Degree
An academic degree is an award conferred by a college or university signifying that the recipient has satisfactorily completed all requirements for the degree.

Degree Elective
An elective is any course not specifically required for your core, major or minor. Most of the time, electives are necessary to reach 120 total graduation hours.

Degree Plan/Requirements
A list of courses and other requirements needed to complete a degree.

Degree-Seeking Student
A student who is enrolled in courses for credit and recognized by the university as taking these courses to earn a degree.

Department
A division of a college or university that is responsible for a given subject, such as English, mathematical sciences or computer science.

Drop/Add Period
The period of time at the beginning of each term when students can drop or add classes without penalty.

Early Progress Grades
Progress reports for students in 1000 and 2000 level classes, usually during the seventh week of the semester.

FERPA
The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) states that student educational records are confidential and may not be released without the consent of the student.

Full-time Student
A student who takes 12 or more credit hours a semester.

Grade Forgiveness
A student may improve his or her undergraduate cumulative grade point average by repeating a maximum of two courses in which he or she previously earned a D or F.

Hold
A registration hold occurs when the university blocks a student’s access to the registration system because he or she has not met a particular requirement, such as paying a library fine or a parking ticket, taking care of a disciplinary sanction, or participating in a required advising session.

Internship
Student integrates career–related experiences into an undergraduate education by participating in supervised work.

Major
A field of study for a degree.

Minor
Secondary area of academic study requiring fewer courses and credits than a major.

Natural Sciences
Science courses pertaining to the “natural” world, such as biology, physics and chemistry.

Non-Credit
Educational course that does not offer credit toward a degree.

Non-Degree Seeking Student
A student taking classes but not intending to apply these courses toward a degree.

Non-Resident
A student who is not classified as an Arkansas resident for the purpose of paying tuition and fees.

Online Classes
Regularly scheduled in person classroom instruction is replaced by required activities completed at a distance and managed online.

Overload
Registering for a number of credit hours above those considered the maximum full-time load.

Override
A request to be placed in a class that has reached the listed capacity in UAConnect; Each department on campus develops its own override request process.

Placement Test
A test given to a student entering a college or university to determine specific knowledge or proficiency in a subject for the purpose of assignment to the appropriate course.

Plagiarism
Taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as one’s own.

Prerequisite
A requirement that must be met before a subsequent activity can take place, such as a course that must be completed prior to beginning another course.

Priority Registration Period
The time during which current students may register for upcoming semesters. Typically priority registration for spring classes is the first two weeks of November and priority registration for summer and fall classes is the first two weeks of April. Students are assigned a specific registration date and time by classification.

Professor
Highest academic rank at a university.

Provost
The Provost is the second in command at the university and is responsible for all academic areas. At the University of Arkansas, all college deans report to the Provost.

Registrar
An administrator in a college or university who is in charge of the student records of enrollment and academic standing.

Scholarship
A type of financial aid in the form of a grant that is given for achievement in academics or other areas and that does not have to be repaid.

Semester
A half–year term in a college or university, typically lasting between 15 and 18 weeks.

Student Standing
Also called classification, student standing is determined by the number of completed hours at the end of each term. Up to 30 hours = freshman, 30–59 hours = sophomore, 60–89 hours = junior, 90 hours or above = senior.

Study Abroad
Educational activities or programs which a student completes outside the United States; these can include credit or noncredit courses, service learning, field research, travel seminars, etc.

Supplemental Instruction (SI)
SI is a peer–facilitated academic support program that targets difficult courses and offers regularly scheduled out–of–class small group discussions and review sessions for clarification of the material taught in the courses.

Syllabus
An outline of the goals of a course, materials to be used, schedule of topics and methods of evaluation.

Term
Generally a synonym for a semester.

Transcript
List of courses accumulated through university study and the grades earned; available through the registrar’s office.

Transfer Equivalency Guide
A database accessed through the registrar’s website that shows which courses transfer to the University of Arkansas from other schools and how they transfer.

UAConnect
A software program that allows information on students – address, academic history, grades, etc. – to be kept in one place and accessed electronically.

University Core
35 credit hours of general education courses designed to provide students with foundational critical thinking and communication skills, application of quantitative skills, the understanding of the human heritage, and adaptability to a changing world – all characteristics of a broadly educated individual.

"W"
A grade indicating that a student withdrew from a class after the first 10 days of the semester but before the course drop deadline.