Spring 2017

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental building blocks for understanding the contemporary Middle East/Islamic World. Students will be introduced to a variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of the geo-cultural region, including history, politics, arts and literature, religions and cultures, social geography, and economics.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: M/W, 3:05-4:20 PM
Room: MAIN 423

This course explores how Muslims perceive Islam as a normative belief system and how they practice the norms in their everyday lives. This course will provide students with authoritative textual references to the Islamic belief system and compare them with ethnographic observations of practice in different cultural milieu of some selected regions or countries. As such, this course will explore the relationship between the key teachings of Islam and the customary practices of its adherents. It will examine a wide array of theoretical concepts and practices, such as justice, human rights, Islamic state, modernism, citizenship, democracy, war and peace, madrasa and Islamic education, gender, abortion and the use of contraception, environment, Islamic banking and finance, animal care, and Muslim identity in the diaspora in addition to the basic tenets of Islam. It will engage students to the study of Islam and its adherents within the changing global dynamics as well. It will therefore address the religious, political, economic, and social changes that have been taking place in the contemporary world and the ways Muslim communities have been addressing or coping with them. Prerequisite: MEST 2003.

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar
Schedule: Tu/Th, 2:00-3:15 PM
Room: KIMP 211

Focuses on essential doctrines of the Christian faith, historical contexts from which these doctrines grew, and scriptural and traditional arguments made by different theological positions in both ancient and modern doctrinal debates. Examines the experiential side of Christianity, emphasizing the worship and ritualistic observances of various ancient and modern communities. Prerequisite: MEST 2203 or HIST 3003.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: Tu/Th, 3:30 - 4:45 PM
Room: KIMP 305

Introduction to biblical Israel and Judah. Examines the ancient Hebrew language, focusing on sacred texts produced during Israel's Iron Age II period. Introduces the ancient Hebrew alphabet, biblical Hebrew vocabulary, morphology, and syntax in the context of the Old Testament. Some extra-biblical Hebrew texts will also be considered.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: M, 6:00-9:00 PM
Room: KIMP 211

An exploration of varied topics related to the Middle East and North Africa studied independently with the supervision of a faculty member. Credit arranged with instructor. Prerequisite: Instructor consent and junior standing.

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar; Allen, Spencer; Paradise, Tom
Schedule: TBA

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

This course will examine the style, materials, beauty, and evolution of Islamic Arts and architecture across the globe.  We will address architecture and art through images, video,
and readings as to how faith and function combine in religious structure (i.e. mosque, minaret, madrasa), and in civic structures (i.e. dams, public spaces, bridges, caravansaries). In addition, we will address these wonders through practical workshops where we will be making Islamic mosaics, designing calligraphy, and metal-leafing paper, stone, and brick. We will be learning about these beautiful art forms, and then making them ourselves.

Instructor: Paradise, Tom
Schedule: Tu/Th, 3:30-4:45 PM
Room: KIMP 211

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Like any other religion, Islam is a contested religious tradition. It is contested not only among those who critically study but also among those who practice it. This contest officially began during the period of the first caliph of Islam, Abu Bakr (d. 634), when several groups of early Muslims wanted to elect other prominent figures as the successor of Prophet Muhammad. The early theological debate attained its zenith during the rule of the fourth caliph ‘Ali (d. 661), when a group of his supporters left him, accusing the caliph of being a deviant. This group later became known as the khawariji or kharajite (meaning those who went out), who claimed that only their belief was the right belief.  It is also said that there is no papacy in Islam, leading many to believe that the religion lacks a figure to authoritatively define what Islam is. The question of heresy is thus an oblivious issue in Islam. Nevertheless, there are said to be 73 sects in Islam, all of which claim itself as orthodox or the correct Islam and the rest as bida or innovation or heresy.  This course will address the issues of orthodoxy and heresy as defined by Muslim scholars at different points of history and explore how these definitions and interpretations affect Muslim communities of the past as well as the present.    

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar
Schedule: Th, 6:00-9:00 PM
Room: BELL 2291

Courses in lecture or seminar format to be offered in a variety of disciplines relating to the history, culture, politics, geography, languages, literature, arts, and religions of the Middle East, North Africa, and/or Islamic world. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Bahram, Ikram
Schedule: W, 6:00-9:00 PM
Room: KIMP 2017

Internship experience with a group, firm, agency, or non-profit organization related to the Middle East and/or North Africa (MENA). Local, regional, and international internships (paid and unpaid) may take place with various NGOs, related corporations, and US Agencies and Departments. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

 

Explores multiple aspects of Ancient Egyptian civilization including chronology, art, religion, literature and daily life. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Instructor: Morey, Erika
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM
Room: MAIN 319

An exploration of rituals, symbols, and rules that shape religious life. Religion is viewed broadly, considering activities that invoke powers beyond the reach of ordinary senses. Examining a variety of cultures, we explore what people say and do as they participate in activities such as magic, healing, pilgrimage, and contemporary religious movements.

Instructor: D'Alisera, JoAnn
Schedule: Tu/Th, 9:30-10:45 AM
Room: MAIN423

Crosslisted with HIST3823.

Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Brubaker, Robert
Schedule: M/W/F, 9:30-10:45 AM
Room: MEMH 318

Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Swedenburg, Ted
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM
Room: MAIN423

Equivalent to 2013. Leads to greater oral comprehension and speaking ability and develops the more advanced reading and writing skills. Emphasizes morphology and syntax.

Instructor: Haydar, Paula
Schedule: M/W/F, 9:40-10:30 AM; Tu/Th, 9:30-10:45 AM
Room: KIMP 211

Equivalent to 2013. Leads to greater oral comprehension and speaking ability and develops the more advanced reading and writing skills. Emphasizes morphology and syntax.

Instructor: Haydar, Paula
Schedule: M/W/F, 10:45-11:35 AM; Tu/Th, 11:00-12:15 PM
Room: KIMP 211

Continued development of speaking, comprehension, reading, writing. Reading assignments introduce a variety of styles ranging from classical to modern in both prose and verse.

Instructor: Haydar, Adnan
Schedule: M/W/F, 9:40-10:30 AM; Tu/Th, 9:30-10:45 AM
Room: KIMP 205

Continued advanced speaking, reading, and writing skills. Prerequisite: ARAB 4023.

Instructor: Haydar, Adnan
Schedule: 10:45-11:35 AM
Room: KIMP 205

The study of gender or sexuality and literature, with attention to specific theories, themes, genres, authors, historical moments, literary movements, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Fares, Nicole
Schedule: Th, 11:00-1:45 PM
Room: KIMP 713

A survey of the foundation, evolution, and distinctive character of Islam, with attention to religion, literature, art, architecture, science, and political society. Particular attention given to the development of Islamic doctrines, sectarian movements, and systematic theology. Concludes with a look at Islamic resurgence movements and their place in the contemporary world.

Instructor: Antov, Nikolay
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM
Room: KIMP 414

Crosslisted with ANTH3903.

Historical topics in Asian history, including the eastern Pacific region, which are not usually presented in depth in regular courses. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Brubaker, Robert
Schedule: M/W/F, 9:30-10:45 AM
Room: MEMH 318

Treats a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in history). May be repeated for degree credit.

This colloquium will study the impact that the Crusades (defined as religious wars proclaimed and/or supported by the Papacy) and crusading politics in Western Europe and the Mediterranean had on the political, religio-cultural, and socio-economic development of the Islamic world.  This includes an analysis of the ways in which the Crusades shaped Islamic legal and political theory (e.g., evolving conceptualizations of jihad), conduct of warfare, Muslim conceptualizations of Christianity and Christendom, as well as everyday life (including major aspects of the relations between Muslims and non-Muslims in the Islamic world).  For the purposes of this colloquium the crusading era will be broadly defined, i.e. from the late 11th to the late 16th centuries (thus also including crusading campaigns and crusading politics following the fall of the Kingdom of Jerusalem in 1291).

The colloquium will feature discussions of both modern scholarly texts as well as primary sources.  While some attention will be paid to classic western conceptualizations of the Crusades (specifically in the first couple of weeks),  The prevailing emphasis will be on Islamic perspectives, especially in the context of discussions of primary sources of Islamic provenance (in English translation).

Instructor: Antov, Nikolay
Schedule: Th, 3:30-6:20 PM
Room: MAIN 420
 

Topics in political science not usually covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit.

What is gender? Are there any defining characteristics that distinguish it from women studies? Are there differences between western and non-western understandings of studying gender and women? Juxtaposing both western and non-western perspectives on gender and women, this course will survey the major theories, traditions and practices, and public policy issues of some selected countries of the Middle East. This course analyzes the dilemmas and difficulties of a modern state in implementing secular public policies, as well as the apparently antagonistic relationship between religious traditions and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in some selected countries in the Middle East.

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar
Schedule: Tu/Th, 3:30-4:45 PM
Room: KIMP 312

An analysis of geo-political and socio-economic characteristics of Middle Eastern societies and their impact on world economic and political order. Special attention to such issues as the Arab-Israeli conflict, the promotion of lasting peace in the region, impact of oil on world politics, the involvement of superpowers, rehabilitation of Palestinian refugees and the role of the United Nations.

Instructor: Ghadbian, Najib
Schedule: M, 6:00-8:30 PM
Room: JBHT 149

A course (not independent study) which covers a topic or author not usually presented in depth in regular courses. May be repeated for degree credit.

Instructor: Haydar, Paula
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM
Room: MAIN 204

January Intercession 2017

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

The second portion of the New Testament – comprising the book of Acts, 7 Pauline Epistles,
and 6 Deutero-Pauline Epistles – have been read and interpreted by the Christian faithful as
scripture for nearly two millennia. Not surprisingly, Paul quickly attained première status in
the eyes of the church and its believers. This course will introduce students to the books of
the New Testament, as well as extra-biblical texts, which discuss this figure, their major
concerns, themes, and ideas. Students will also be introduced to the search for the historical
Paul depicted in the New Testament and the methodologies of contemporary New
Testament scholarship used to find him. Special attention will be given to the historical
background of the Bible, the Greco-Roman world, the numerous communities comprising
the early Christian movements, and the various literary genres found in the New Testament.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: M-S, 12:00-3:45 PM
Room: MAIN 420

Fall 2016

This course introduces Islam as a global religion and world civilization, including study of the Qur'an, prophet Muhammad, ritual and community practices, metaphysics, mysticism, art, literature, and sacred and critical history.

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar
Schedule: Tu/Th, 2:00-3:15 PM

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental building blocks for understanding the contemporary Middle East/Islamic World. Students will be introduced to a variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of the geo-cultural region, including history, politics, arts and literature, religions and cultures, social geography, and economics.

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar
Schedule: M/W, 3:05-4:20 PM

Introduces the geography, events, characters, and histories that formed Christianity--from early band of Jews into its global and colonial ascendancy today. Focus on people, conflicts, disagreements, theological locations and the influence of geo-politics and effects of financial, political and/or military control.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: Tu/Th, 6:20-7:35 PM

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Bassiri, Kaveh
Schedule: W, 5:15-8:05 PM

Introduction to biblical Israel and Judah. Examines the ancient Hebrew language, focusing on sacred texts produced during Israel's Iron Age II period. Introduces the ancient Hebrew alphabet, biblical Hebrew vocabulary, morphology, and syntax in the context of the Old Testament. Some extra-biblical Hebrew texts will also be considered.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM

Introduces students to the history of Islam in East and Southeast Asia over the past 1,200 years. It focuses on the 18th-21st centuries when Muslims were part of everyday life in Asia and participated in the formation of majority and minority identities in the region.

Instructor: Hammond, Kelly
Schedule: Tu/Th, 9:30-10:45 AM

Explores multiple aspects of Ancient Egyptian civilization including chronology, art, religion, literature and daily life. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Instructor: Morey, Erika
Schedule: M/W, 3:05-4:20 PM

Study of the peoples and cultures of the Middle East; ecology, ethnicity, economics, social organizations, gender, politics, religion, and patterns of social change.

Instructor: Swedenburg, Ted
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM 

Equivalent to 1003 and 1013. Stresses correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. Basic grammar is taught inductively through oral and written skills.

Instructor: Haydar, Paula
Schedule: M/W/F, 9:40-10:30 AM; Tu/Th, 9:30-10:45 AM 

Equivalent to 1003 and 1013. Stresses correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. Basic grammar is taught inductively through oral and written skills.

Instructor: Haydar, Paula
Schedule: M/W/F, 10:45-11:35 AM; Tu/Th, 11:00-12:15 PM

Leads to greater facility in the spoken language and continues to develop reading and writing skills. Continued emphasis on morphology and syntax. Prerequisite: ARAB 2016.

Instructor: Haydar, Adnan
Schedule: M/W/F, 9:40-10:30 AM; Tu/Th, 9:30-10:45 AM

Development of advanced speaking and writing skills. Extensive reading and writing assignments and translating exercises from English into Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 4016.

Instructor: Haydar, Adnan
Schedule: M/W/F, 10:45-11:35 AM

May be offered in a topic not specifically covered by courses otherwise listed.

Instructor: Haydar, Adnan
Schedule: TBA

Physical and cultural landscapes, natural and cultural resources, art and architecture, land use, political history, OPEC, and current problems of North Africa and the Middle East region west of Afghanistan are discussed. Class participation, discussions, slides and films, and student presentations will round out the class. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Instructor: Paradise, Tom
Schedule: W, 6:00-8:50 PM

A survey of the foundation, evolution, and distinctive character of Islam, with attention to religion, literature, art, architecture, science, and political society. Particular attention given to the development of Islamic doctrines, sectarian movements, and systematic theology. Concludes with a look at Islamic resurgence movements and their place in the contemporary world.

Instructor: Antov, Nikolay
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM

Examines the history of the Islamic Middle East from the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Persian empires up to World War I and then concludes with the issues and patterns of 20th century Middle Eastern political and socio-economic life. Topics include Islam and politics, Arab nationalism, Western imperialism, the Arab-Zionist conflict, petroleum politics, and modernization vs. traditionalism.

Instructor:  Gordon, Joel
Schedule:  W, 3:05-5:55 PM

An examination of the historical development of the three great Islamic empires in the early modern period- the Ottomans, the Safavids of Iran, and the Mughals of India. Special attention given to imperial expansion, administrative structures, religious-legal establishment, and the formation of distinct traditions in political ideology, historiography, and the arts and sciences.

Instructor: Antov, Nikolay
Schedule: Tu/Th 3:30-4:45 PM

Cross-listed as MEST4103

Introduces students to the history of Islam in East and Southeast Asia over the past 1,200 years. It focuses on the 18th-21st centuries when Muslims were part of everyday life in Asia and participated in the formation of majority and minority identities in the region.

Instructor: Hammond, Kelly
Schedule: Tu/Th, 9:30-10:45 AM

An analysis of Middle East history in the 17th-20th centuries which focuses on the social transformation of urban and rural life. Particular emphasis is given to the roles of economics, genealogy, art, and popular culture.

Instructor: Gordon, Joel
Schedule: T, 5:00-7:50 PM

Survey of the unity and diversity in the political development of the Middle East, as evident in historical legacies, state formation, civil society, social class, and political identity.

Instructor: Ghadbian, Najib
Schedule: F, 2:00-4:30 PM 

Compares contemporary Islamist political movements. Seeks to explain causes, debates, agendas, and strategies of Islamists in the political realm. Addresses sovereignty, the rule of law, visions of the good state and society, and relations between nationalism, religion and political development. Focus on Middle East with comparative reference to other cases.

Instructor: Ghadbian, Najib
Schedule: Th, 6:00-8:30 PM

The Quran as literary text, its style and form, historical context, translation issues, communities of interpretation, and comparative perspectives. Course's integrated approach includes translations of literature originally in Arabic. All readings in English; students with reading abilities in Arabic encouraged to read original text.

Instructor: Kahf, Mohja
Schedule: 11:00-12:15 PM 

Summer Session I 2016

Examines the history of the Islamic Middle East from the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Persian empires up to World War I and then concludes with the issues and patterns of 20th century Middle Eastern political and socio-economic life. Topics include Islam and politics, Arab nationalism, Western imperialism, the Arab-Zionist conflict, petroleum politics, and modernization vs. traditionalism.

Instructor:  Parnell, Matt
Schedule:  M-F, 9:15-10:45 AM

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental building blocks for understanding the contemporary Middle East/Islamic World. Students will be introduced to a variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of the geo-cultural region, including history, politics, arts and literature, religions and cultures, social geography, and economics.

Instructor:  Kahf, Mohja
Schedule:  M-F, 11:00 - 12:30 PM

A course (not independent study) which covers a topic or author not usually presented in depth in regular courses. May be repeated for degree credit.

Instructor: Haydar, Paula
Schedule: M-F 11:00 - 12:30 PM

Spring 2016

This course introduces Islam as a global religion and world civilization, including study of the Qur'an, prophet Muhammad, ritual and community practices, metaphysics, mysticism, art, literature, and sacred and critical history.

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar
Schedule: Tu/Th, 2:00-3:15 PM

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental building blocks for understanding the contemporary Middle East/Islamic World. Students will be introduced to a variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of the geo-cultural region, including history, politics, arts and literature, religions and cultures, social geography, and economics.

Instructor:  Gordon, Joel
Schedule:  W, 3:00-5:00 PM

Cross-listed as HIST3853

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: Tu, 6:00-8:50 PM

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: Tu/Th, 3:30-4:45 PM

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: Th, 6:00-8:50 PM

An exploration of varied topics related to the Middle East and North Africa studied independently with the supervision of a faculty member. Credit arranged with instructor. Prerequisite: Instructor consent and junior standing.

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar; Allen, Spencer; Paradise, Tom
Schedule: TBA

Explores multiple aspects of Ancient Egyptian civilization including chronology, art, religion, literature and daily life. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Instructor: Morey, Erika
Schedule: M/W, 3:05-4:20 PM 

Cross-listed as HIST3823

Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Brubaker, Robert
Schedule: 9:40 - 10:30 AM

Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Swedenburg, Ted
Schedule: Tu/Th, 11:00-12:15 PM 

Equivalent to 2013. Leads to greater oral comprehension and speaking ability and develops the more advanced reading and writing skills. Emphasizes morphology and syntax.

Instructor: Haydar, Paula
Schedule: M/W/F, 9:40-10:30 AM; Tu/Th, 9:30-10:45 AM

Equivalent to 2013. Leads to greater oral comprehension and speaking ability and develops the more advanced reading and writing skills. Emphasizes morphology and syntax.

Instructor: Haydar, Paula
Schedule: M/W/F, 10:45-11:35 AM; Tu/Th, 11:00-12:15 PM

Continued advanced speaking, reading, and writing skills. Prerequisite: ARAB 4023.

Instructor: Haydar, Adnan
Schedule: M/W/F 12:55-1:45 PM

A survey of the foundation, evolution, and distinctive character of Islam, with attention to religion, literature, art, architecture, science, and political society. Particular attention given to the development of Islamic doctrines, sectarian movements, and systematic theology. Concludes with a look at Islamic resurgence movements and their place in the contemporary world.

Instructor: Parnell, Matt
Schedule: Tu/Th, 2:00-3:15 PM

History of 19th-20th Century Palestine, Zionism and the founding of modern Israel, and the Palestine-Israel conflict in local and regional perspective.

Instructor: Parnell, Matt
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM

Cross-listed as ANTH3903.

Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Brubaker, Robert
Schedule: 9:40 - 10:30 AM

Required for all history majors. Examines research methods and current theories of interpreting and evaluating the past. Emphasizes skills of analysis, synthesis, and integration. Students produce a primary source-based research paper. A grade of a B or better will satisfy the Fulbright senior writing requirement. Prerequisite: History major; senior standing.

Instructor: Gordon, Joel
Schedule: Tu, 5:00-7:50 PM

Survey of the unity and diversity in the political development of the Middle East, as evident in historical legacies, state formation, civil society, social class, and political identity.

Instructor: Ben Ali, Dhia
Schedule: M/W, 6:20-7:35 PM

Topics in political science not usually covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit.

Instructor: Alam, Sarwar
Schedule: Tu/Th, 12:30-1:45 PM

Compares contemporary Islamist political movements. Seeks to explain causes, debates, agendas, and strategies of Islamists in the political realm. Addresses sovereignty, the rule of law, visions of the good state and society, and relations between nationalism, religion and political development. Focus on Middle East with comparative reference to other cases.

Instructor: Brown, Dan
Schedule: 12:55-1:45 PM

An analysis of geo-political and socio-economic characteristics of Middle Eastern societies and their impact on world economic and political order. Special attention to such issues as the Arab-Israeli conflict, the promotion of lasting peace in the region, impact of oil on world politics, the involvement of superpowers, rehabilitation of Palestinian refugees and the role of the United Nations.

Instructor: Ghadbian, Najib
Schedule: M, 6:00-8:30 PM

Covers a topic not usually presented in depth in regular courses. Not an independent study. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Kahf, Mohja
Schedule: M/W/F, 12:55-1:45 PM

January Intercession 2016

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: M-S, 12:00-3:45 PM

An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Ghadbian, Najib
Schedule: M-S, 12:00-3:45 PM

Historical topics which are not usually presented in depth in regular courses. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

Instructor: Allen, Spencer
Schedule: M-S, 12:00-3:45 PM

Topics in political science not usually covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit.

Instructor: Ghadbian, Najib
Schedule: M-S, 12:00-3:45 PM