Research

The research facilities in the department are among the best in the area with an excellent selection of well-maintained, state-of-the-art equipment. These facilities, along with an atmosphere that encourages collaboration, allow students and faculty to pursue competitive work at the frontiers of their fields. Participation by undergraduates is strongly encouraged.

The facilities are located in three buildings — the Chemistry Building (CHEM) which houses the main office suite, faculty offices, and classroom space; the Chemistry Research Building (CHBC) which houses research laboratories; and Discovery Hall (DISC) which houses the undergraduate teaching laboratories.

The Chemistry Building (CHEM) was  renovated in 2004 and reoccupied in 2007. The building contains 8100 square feet of modern wet laboratory space with modular furnishings and 5800 square feet of instrument space. It also contains faculty offices, library, administrative offices, conference rooms and classrooms. The building is plumbed to utilize the boil-off from a 6000 gallon liquid nitrogen Dewar which provides liquid nitrogen for the some of the instrumentation. 

The Chemistry and Biochemistry Research Building (CHBC) is dedicated completely to research with no office or classroom space. It was completed in 1996 and provides an additional 14,000 square feet of wet laboratory space and 6800 square feet of instrumentation space.

The Center for Protein Structure and Function was established in 2000 through a $9.6 million grant from the NIH NCRR. The grant was renewed in 2005 and the center continues to thrive.

The Statewide Mass Spectrometry Facility, a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry resource, was established in 1999 by a combination of National Science Foundation and state funding. Through the associated grants, these centers and the department have acquired a significant number of cutting-edge instruments.

The following is a partial list of the more significant holdings:

NMRs

  • 700 MHz Bruker spectrometer with cryoprobe, triple axis gradients, four channels (H-1,N-15, C-13, H-2), and 0.1 degree sample temperature control
  • 500 MHz Bruker spectrometer with cryoprobe, triple axis gradients, four channels (H-1,N-15,C-13,H-2) and 0.1 degree sample temperature control
  • 500 MHz Bruker spectrometer with triple axis gradients, four channels (H-1,N-15,C-13,H-2), 5 m protein probe, 5 mm broadband probe and 10 mm broad probe
  • 400 MHz Bruker spectrometer with Z gradient and broadband probe
  • 300 MHz Bruker spectrometer with Z gradient and broadband probe
  • 300 MHz Bruker narrow bore probe spectrometer for solid state H-2 and P-31 (with H-1 decoupling)
  • 300 MHz Bruker wide bore probe spectrometer for solid state H-2

ESR

  • EMX Bruker

Mass Spectrometers (Statewide Mass Spectrometry Facility)

  • Varian 320 Triple Quadrupole EI/CI GC/MS.
  • Bruker Reflex III MALDI TOF/TOF  MS
  • Bruker Ultraflex II o-TOFQ  micro-ESI LC/MS Bruker Apex Ultra 9.4 T  MALDI/ESI FT/MS
  • Shimadzu Benchtop GC/MS
  • Bruker Reflex III MALDI TOF MS
  • Bruker Esquire ESI/LC ITMS
  • Ion Spec 9.4T ESI/MALDI FTMS

X-ray Diffraction

  • Rigaku, Saturn-92 CCD and Micro MAS-007 Rotating Anode Generator
  • Rigaku diffractometer with area detector for proteins
  • Bruker Smart X2S diffractometer for small molecules

Supercomputer

Trestles is a state-of-the-art supercomputer with 8,192 processing cores. Trestles has 256 servers, 16.4 terabytes of memory and a processing speed of 79 teraflops.

Other instruments available on campus for use by faculty and students include a number of electron microscopes, atomic force microscopes, confocal microscope and integrated circuit fabrication facilities. The university also maintains a full-time machine shop.