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Physics Department Recognized Nationally for Physics Teacher Preparation

Only 12 universities in the nation – including the University of Arkansas – are being recognized this year by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) for graduating five or more well-prepared physics teachers in the past academic year. Recent estimates by the organization indicate that less than half of all high school physics courses are taught by a well-qualified teacher with a degree in physics. Universities like the U of A that are striving to reverse this trend are being inducted into the group's 5+ Club.

Research Examines Obstacles to Making Biofuel from Perennial Plants

 A University of Arkansas chemistry professor has received a $400,000 award from the National Science Foundation to investigate a roadblock in the harvesting of biomass from perennial plants for the purpose of creating a source of renewable energy. Cellulose fibrils are microfibers of inert carbohydrates within plants. They give wood its durability, for example. Through a process known as pretreatment, chemists separate these fibrils into individual carbohydrate chains that can be digested by enzymes. This process takes a long time, but Wang and other chemists are studying ways to speed it up.

High School Scholars Visit U of A to Gain Geosciences and STEM Skills

This week, 25 high school juniors from across the nation are visiting the University of Arkansas to take part in the Math, Science and Engineering Academy pre-college outreach program – known as MSEA – in partnership with Fort Valley State University in Georgia. Geosciences professor Steve Boss is Kvamme's co-coordinator for the program, and classes are taught by Boss, geosciences emeritus John Van Brahana and electrical engineeringassistant department head Robert Saunders from the College of Engineering.

Bennett Scholarship Gift Supports Students in Two Colleges

A gift from the late Jim and Betty Bennett is being used to create the James Harold and Betty Jo Bennett Endowed Scholarship for undergraduate students at the University of Arkansas. The late Jim and Betty Bennett were native Arkansans, and both were distinguished graduates of the university. As a nod to the couple’s majors, the scholarship will benefit two students each year – one studying chemical engineering in the College of Engineering and one studying mathematical sciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

U of A Geosciences Reaches Significant $500,000 Fundraising Milestone

The University of Arkansas Department of Geosciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Scienceshas succeeded in raising more than $500,000 to meet the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation Match for geosciences doctoral fellowships. This is the latest of several milestones the department has achieved over the last 10 years, including:

U of A Evolutionary Biologist Awarded $540,000 by Simons Foundation

The Simons Foundation has awarded $540,000 to University of Arkansas biologist Andrew Alverson to study the evolution of microscopic marine algae in the Baltic Sea. Alverson is one of four researchers across the United States selected as a 2016 Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution.

U of A Graduate Student Selected for DOE Science Research Award

Raymond Walter, a doctoral student in physics and mathematics, is the first student from the University of Arkansas selected for a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Research Award.  The award program will provide Walter a $3,000 monthly stipend for up to one year and a $2,000 travel allowance. The program gives doctoral candidates an opportunity to conduct a significant part of their doctoral dissertation research in collaboration with scientists at a Department of Energy national laboratory. Awardees are selected on the basis of a submitted research proposal aligned with one of the Office of Science Priority Research areas.

U of A Leads Effort to Nurture Research Collaborations in Southeast Asia

The University of Arkansas is helping lead an effort to develop a bioscience network of scientists in the United States and Southeast Asia. The National Science Foundation recently awarded a $500,000 grant to establish the Food, Energy, Water and Ecosystems Resources Research Coordination Network, to build a team of minority and minority-serving faculty to strengthen research collaborations in the U.S. and enhance ties between U.S. faculty scientists and researchers working at institutions in Vietnam, Thailand and Malaysia.

U of A Researcher Links Mass Extinctions to 'Planet X'

Periodic mass extinctions on Earth, as indicated in the global fossil record, could be linked to a suspected ninth planet, according to research published by a faculty member of the University of Arkansas Department of Mathematical Sciences. Daniel Whitmire, a retired professor of astrophysics now working as a math instructor, published findings in the January issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society that the as yet undiscovered “Planet X” triggers comet showers linked to mass extinctions on Earth at intervals of approximately 27 million years.

Fulbright College Chemistry and Mathematics Major Awarded Two National Fellowships

Undergraduate senior honors chemistry and mathematics major Craig McLean recently received not one, but two prestigious national fellowships, one from the National Science Foundation and a second from the National GEM Consortium. "Craig is the first honors undergraduate researcher I've worked with who took basic skills in protein biochemistry that he learned in my laboratory and applied them to the development of his own original research project," said Paul D. Adams, McLean's honors thesis adviser and an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and in the Cellular and Molecular Biology Program. "I found this to be remarkable to say the least!"

 

Physics Department Recognized Nationally for Physics Teacher Preparation

Only 12 universities in the nation – including the University of Arkansas – are being recognized this year by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) for graduating five or more well-prepared physics teachers in the past academic year. Recent estimates by the organization indicate that less than half of all high school physics courses are taught by a well-qualified teacher with a degree in physics. Universities like the U of A that are striving to reverse this trend are being inducted into the group's 5+ Club.

U of A Bands Commits Over $1 Million in Scholarships to Arkansas Students

Becoming part of “the Best in Sight and Sound” just got even better – now Arkansas students who want to study music at the University of Arkansas or join one of the U of A bands can receive a $5,000 annual scholarship to help them achieve these goals. Starting in fall 2016, the newly founded Arkansas Music Initiative will commit more than $1 million in scholarship support over the next five years for students planning to study music in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

Latino Youth Visit Campus, Hone Spanish and English Language Skills

Jose Flores perched on a stool in a Discovery Hall chemistry lab, pulled on a pair of oversized goggles and grinned at his lab partner. "I'm a scientist!" the 12-year-old exclaimed. The duo mashed chopped strawberries with dish detergent, hot water and salt, then filtered the paste through mini coffee filters, and trickled ice cold ethanol into the test tube. Ten minutes later, a whitish-colored layer floated between the pink liquid and the clear ethanol. Jose dipped a wire loop into that layer and pulled out a sticky bead of strawberry DNA.

High School Scholars Visit U of A to Gain Geosciences and STEM Skills

This week, 25 high school juniors from across the nation are visiting the University of Arkansas to take part in the Math, Science and Engineering Academy pre-college outreach program – known as MSEA – in partnership with Fort Valley State University in Georgia. Geosciences professor Steve Boss is Kvamme's co-coordinator for the program, and classes are taught by Boss, geosciences emeritus John Van Brahana and electrical engineeringassistant department head Robert Saunders from the College of Engineering.

Fulbright College Faculty Member Establishes Travel Abroad Fund for Students

Focusing on international education is not unusual at the university's J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences – after all the college's namesake is quoted as saying "international educational exchange is the most significant current project designed to continue the process of humanizing mankind to the point, we would hope, that men can learn to live in peace." But for the average student, studying abroad often comes with potentially prohibitive costs. And, if a student doesn't have the financial means, such essential educational opportunities can easily fall by the wayside.

Gift Creates New Addition in Kimpel Hall for Journalism, Student Media

University of Arkansas students involved with the Department of Journalism and student media will have a new venue created for them in Kimpel Hall, thanks to a gift from alumna Susan Walk Burnett and her husband, Rusty Burnett, of Houston. The couple has pledged $1 million for a new addition to the second floor of Kimpel Hall that will include an integrated newsroom where students from all journalism disciplines will converge. A new UATV television studio will also open to a view of one of the busiest hubs on campus. The addition will be named the Susan Walk Burnett Journalism and Student Media Center in honor of the donors, subject to the Board of Trustees’ approval.

Jessamy Eve Samuels Memorial Scholarship Honors Her Life and Legacy

A wicked sense of humor, a keen interest in human rights and politics, a sparkling personality and a quick wit best described Jessamy Eve Samuels – and it’s with these qualities in mind that her family and friends recently established the Jessamy Eve Samuels Memorial Scholarship in her honor. Jessamy passed away in May 2016 after a tragic fall while hiking at Hawksbill Crag in Newton County, devastating those close to the vibrant 19-year-old University of Arkansas freshman. She was an honors student in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and was interested in studying anthropology and journalism. Her death occurred a year to the day after Jessamy graduated from Rogers High School with Distinguished Honors.

U of A Geosciences Reaches Significant $500,000 Fundraising Milestone

The University of Arkansas Department of Geosciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Scienceshas succeeded in raising more than $500,000 to meet the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation Match for geosciences doctoral fellowships. This is the latest of several milestones the department has achieved over the last 10 years, including:

Human-Centered Design Class Creates Artifacts to Help Arkansas' Marshallese

Being pulled over by a police officer can already be a nerve-wracking experience. Do you have your license and registration handy? Do you know why you were stopped? Now, imagine you don't speak the same language as the officer. How would you communicate? How will you understand what's happening?

U of A Graduate Student Selected for DOE Science Research Award

Raymond Walter, a doctoral student in physics and mathematics, is the first student from the University of Arkansas selected for a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Research Award.  The award program will provide Walter a $3,000 monthly stipend for up to one year and a $2,000 travel allowance. The program gives doctoral candidates an opportunity to conduct a significant part of their doctoral dissertation research in collaboration with scientists at a Department of Energy national laboratory. Awardees are selected on the basis of a submitted research proposal aligned with one of the Office of Science Priority Research areas.

Fulbright College Chemistry and Mathematics Major Awarded Two National Fellowships

Undergraduate senior honors chemistry and mathematics major Craig McLean recently received not one, but two prestigious national fellowships, one from the National Science Foundation and a second from the National GEM Consortium. "Craig is the first honors undergraduate researcher I've worked with who took basic skills in protein biochemistry that he learned in my laboratory and applied them to the development of his own original research project," said Paul D. Adams, McLean's honors thesis adviser and an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and in the Cellular and Molecular Biology Program. "I found this to be remarkable to say the least!"

U of A Graduate Student Creates Guide for the USDA and EPA Aimed to Reduce Food Waste

It’s a difficult statistic to stomach, but a staggering 31 to 40 percent of food produced in the U.S. ends up in landfills each year.  With numbers like these, Melissa Terry, a graduate student in the Master of Public Administration and Nonprofit Studies program in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Political Science, knew something needed to change. 

Students Fuse Visual and Culinary Arts to Create a 'Kiln-to-Table' Experience

Ceramics and graphic design students from two University of Arkansas art classes are joining forces with a top local culinary team to create an unforgettable kiln-to-table dining experience for Northwest Arkansas art and food aficionados alike. The Sunday, Dec. 11 event – Artisans at the Depot: A Kiln to Table Experience – will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the first of four gourmet courses prepared by Chef Patrick Lane at Arsaga’s at The Depot, 548 W. Dickson Street in Fayetteville.

Tibetan Studies Students Create, Then Prepare to Destroy Intricate Sand Mandalas

Students gather around two tables in the front of the classroom, taking turns adding brightly colored sand to the chalked outlines of mandalas, or intricate geometric designs, that are meant to represent our universe. A soft, rhythmic scraping noise fills the room but it is not unpleasant. This is the sound of the chak-pur, a conical metal funnel with ridged sides. By moving a metal stick down the side of the chak-pur, the students can carefully control the distribution and placement of the sands they work with.

 

Physics Department Recognized Nationally for Physics Teacher Preparation

Only 12 universities in the nation – including the University of Arkansas – are being recognized this year by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) for graduating five or more well-prepared physics teachers in the past academic year. Recent estimates by the organization indicate that less than half of all high school physics courses are taught by a well-qualified teacher with a degree in physics. Universities like the U of A that are striving to reverse this trend are being inducted into the group's 5+ Club.

Researchers Examine How Arkansas.gov Can Better Serve State's Businesses

A new survey by communication researchers at the University of Arkansas revealed that Arkansas businesses frequently interact with state government online, especially for routine tasks, such as paying taxes or applying for permits. Attitudes that business people have about dealing with e-government vary according to business size, the survey showed, with the state’s smallest businesses – those with 10 or fewer full-time employees – preferring face-to-face interaction and other traditional means of conducting business with government agencies.

M.F.A. Theatre Directing Alumna Earns Prestigious Assistantship

Kholoud Sawaf, who earned her M.F.A. in theatre directing last August, has been awarded an Artistic Assistantship in Directing at the Tony Award-winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Kholoud will be in residency for six weeks at the festival, with responsibilities including assisting on a production of the new comedy Vietgone, by Qui Nguyen. This highly competitive award includes housing, round-trip airfare, and a stipend.

Latino Youth Visit Campus, Hone Spanish and English Language Skills

Jose Flores perched on a stool in a Discovery Hall chemistry lab, pulled on a pair of oversized goggles and grinned at his lab partner. "I'm a scientist!" the 12-year-old exclaimed. The duo mashed chopped strawberries with dish detergent, hot water and salt, then filtered the paste through mini coffee filters, and trickled ice cold ethanol into the test tube. Ten minutes later, a whitish-colored layer floated between the pink liquid and the clear ethanol. Jose dipped a wire loop into that layer and pulled out a sticky bead of strawberry DNA.

High School Scholars Visit U of A to Gain Geosciences and STEM Skills

This week, 25 high school juniors from across the nation are visiting the University of Arkansas to take part in the Math, Science and Engineering Academy pre-college outreach program – known as MSEA – in partnership with Fort Valley State University in Georgia. Geosciences professor Steve Boss is Kvamme's co-coordinator for the program, and classes are taught by Boss, geosciences emeritus John Van Brahana and electrical engineeringassistant department head Robert Saunders from the College of Engineering.

Fulbright College Faculty Member Establishes Travel Abroad Fund for Students

Focusing on international education is not unusual at the university's J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences – after all the college's namesake is quoted as saying "international educational exchange is the most significant current project designed to continue the process of humanizing mankind to the point, we would hope, that men can learn to live in peace." But for the average student, studying abroad often comes with potentially prohibitive costs. And, if a student doesn't have the financial means, such essential educational opportunities can easily fall by the wayside.

Bennett Scholarship Gift Supports Students in Two Colleges

A gift from the late Jim and Betty Bennett is being used to create the James Harold and Betty Jo Bennett Endowed Scholarship for undergraduate students at the University of Arkansas. The late Jim and Betty Bennett were native Arkansans, and both were distinguished graduates of the university. As a nod to the couple’s majors, the scholarship will benefit two students each year – one studying chemical engineering in the College of Engineering and one studying mathematical sciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

Jessamy Eve Samuels Memorial Scholarship Honors Her Life and Legacy

A wicked sense of humor, a keen interest in human rights and politics, a sparkling personality and a quick wit best described Jessamy Eve Samuels – and it’s with these qualities in mind that her family and friends recently established the Jessamy Eve Samuels Memorial Scholarship in her honor. Jessamy passed away in May 2016 after a tragic fall while hiking at Hawksbill Crag in Newton County, devastating those close to the vibrant 19-year-old University of Arkansas freshman. She was an honors student in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and was interested in studying anthropology and journalism. Her death occurred a year to the day after Jessamy graduated from Rogers High School with Distinguished Honors.

U of A Anthropologist Part of Team that Identified New Human Ancestor

A University of Arkansas biological anthropologist is part of the international team of scientists who verified that fossils found in a South African cave belong to a new species of human ancestor. The National Geographic Society and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, announced the discovery of the new species — Homo naledi – on Thursday, Sept. 10. The U of A has a partnership with Wits University and researchers here have been working on the project since the fossils were found in 2013.

Human-Centered Design Class Creates Artifacts to Help Arkansas' Marshallese

Being pulled over by a police officer can already be a nerve-wracking experience. Do you have your license and registration handy? Do you know why you were stopped? Now, imagine you don't speak the same language as the officer. How would you communicate? How will you understand what's happening?

U of A Leads Effort to Nurture Research Collaborations in Southeast Asia

The University of Arkansas is helping lead an effort to develop a bioscience network of scientists in the United States and Southeast Asia. The National Science Foundation recently awarded a $500,000 grant to establish the Food, Energy, Water and Ecosystems Resources Research Coordination Network, to build a team of minority and minority-serving faculty to strengthen research collaborations in the U.S. and enhance ties between U.S. faculty scientists and researchers working at institutions in Vietnam, Thailand and Malaysia.

U of A Researcher Links Mass Extinctions to 'Planet X'

Periodic mass extinctions on Earth, as indicated in the global fossil record, could be linked to a suspected ninth planet, according to research published by a faculty member of the University of Arkansas Department of Mathematical Sciences. Daniel Whitmire, a retired professor of astrophysics now working as a math instructor, published findings in the January issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society that the as yet undiscovered “Planet X” triggers comet showers linked to mass extinctions on Earth at intervals of approximately 27 million years.

U of A Graduate Student Creates Guide for the USDA and EPA Aimed to Reduce Food Waste

It’s a difficult statistic to stomach, but a staggering 31 to 40 percent of food produced in the U.S. ends up in landfills each year.  With numbers like these, Melissa Terry, a graduate student in the Master of Public Administration and Nonprofit Studies program in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Political Science, knew something needed to change. 

U of A Psychologist Working With State Law Enforcement on Eyewitness Policy

James Lampinen, distinguished professor of psychological science at the University of Arkansas, is partnering on a project with the Arkansas Association of Chiefs of Police to adopt a science-based model policy for Arkansas law enforcement officers to use that will reduce errors when collecting and evaluating eyewitness identification information. The association’s goal is for all Arkansas police departments and law enforcement agencies to adopt and use this model policy. Lampinen has provided feedback on the policy and is helping to promote it with law enforcement agencies around the state. He will also help train officers in how to effectively use the method.

Students Fuse Visual and Culinary Arts to Create a 'Kiln-to-Table' Experience

Ceramics and graphic design students from two University of Arkansas art classes are joining forces with a top local culinary team to create an unforgettable kiln-to-table dining experience for Northwest Arkansas art and food aficionados alike. The Sunday, Dec. 11 event – Artisans at the Depot: A Kiln to Table Experience – will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the first of four gourmet courses prepared by Chef Patrick Lane at Arsaga’s at The Depot, 548 W. Dickson Street in Fayetteville.

Tibetan Studies Students Create, Then Prepare to Destroy Intricate Sand Mandalas

Students gather around two tables in the front of the classroom, taking turns adding brightly colored sand to the chalked outlines of mandalas, or intricate geometric designs, that are meant to represent our universe. A soft, rhythmic scraping noise fills the room but it is not unpleasant. This is the sound of the chak-pur, a conical metal funnel with ridged sides. By moving a metal stick down the side of the chak-pur, the students can carefully control the distribution and placement of the sands they work with.

 

U of A Bands Commits Over $1 Million in Scholarships to Arkansas Students

Becoming part of “the Best in Sight and Sound” just got even better – now Arkansas students who want to study music at the University of Arkansas or join one of the U of A bands can receive a $5,000 annual scholarship to help them achieve these goals. Starting in fall 2016, the newly founded Arkansas Music Initiative will commit more than $1 million in scholarship support over the next five years for students planning to study music in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

M.F.A. Theatre Directing Alumna Earns Prestigious Assistantship

Kholoud Sawaf, who earned her M.F.A. in theatre directing last August, has been awarded an Artistic Assistantship in Directing at the Tony Award-winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Kholoud will be in residency for six weeks at the festival, with responsibilities including assisting on a production of the new comedy Vietgone, by Qui Nguyen. This highly competitive award includes housing, round-trip airfare, and a stipend.

Human-Centered Design Class Creates Artifacts to Help Arkansas' Marshallese

Being pulled over by a police officer can already be a nerve-wracking experience. Do you have your license and registration handy? Do you know why you were stopped? Now, imagine you don't speak the same language as the officer. How would you communicate? How will you understand what's happening?

Margulis Named Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences

Elizabeth Margulis, professor in the Department of Music, has been named a 2016 Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences. The honor incudes her participation in the Japanese-American Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium Dec. 2-4 in Irvine, California. Kavli Fellows are young scientists selected by the advisory board of the Kavli Foundation, members of the National Academy of Sciences and organizers of the Kavli/National Academy of Sciences Frontiers in Science Symposia series. The Kavli Foundation, based in Oxnard, California, supports scientific research, honors scientific achievement, and promotes public understanding of scientists and their work.

Students Fuse Visual and Culinary Arts to Create a 'Kiln-to-Table' Experience

Ceramics and graphic design students from two University of Arkansas art classes are joining forces with a top local culinary team to create an unforgettable kiln-to-table dining experience for Northwest Arkansas art and food aficionados alike. The Sunday, Dec. 11 event – Artisans at the Depot: A Kiln to Table Experience – will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the first of four gourmet courses prepared by Chef Patrick Lane at Arsaga’s at The Depot, 548 W. Dickson Street in Fayetteville.

Tibetan Studies Students Create, Then Prepare to Destroy Intricate Sand Mandalas

Students gather around two tables in the front of the classroom, taking turns adding brightly colored sand to the chalked outlines of mandalas, or intricate geometric designs, that are meant to represent our universe. A soft, rhythmic scraping noise fills the room but it is not unpleasant. This is the sound of the chak-pur, a conical metal funnel with ridged sides. By moving a metal stick down the side of the chak-pur, the students can carefully control the distribution and placement of the sands they work with.

 

Researchers Examine How Arkansas.gov Can Better Serve State's Businesses

A new survey by communication researchers at the University of Arkansas revealed that Arkansas businesses frequently interact with state government online, especially for routine tasks, such as paying taxes or applying for permits. Attitudes that business people have about dealing with e-government vary according to business size, the survey showed, with the state’s smallest businesses – those with 10 or fewer full-time employees – preferring face-to-face interaction and other traditional means of conducting business with government agencies.

Latino Youth Visit Campus, Hone Spanish and English Language Skills

Jose Flores perched on a stool in a Discovery Hall chemistry lab, pulled on a pair of oversized goggles and grinned at his lab partner. "I'm a scientist!" the 12-year-old exclaimed. The duo mashed chopped strawberries with dish detergent, hot water and salt, then filtered the paste through mini coffee filters, and trickled ice cold ethanol into the test tube. Ten minutes later, a whitish-colored layer floated between the pink liquid and the clear ethanol. Jose dipped a wire loop into that layer and pulled out a sticky bead of strawberry DNA.

Gift Creates New Addition in Kimpel Hall for Journalism, Student Media

University of Arkansas students involved with the Department of Journalism and student media will have a new venue created for them in Kimpel Hall, thanks to a gift from alumna Susan Walk Burnett and her husband, Rusty Burnett, of Houston. The couple has pledged $1 million for a new addition to the second floor of Kimpel Hall that will include an integrated newsroom where students from all journalism disciplines will converge. A new UATV television studio will also open to a view of one of the busiest hubs on campus. The addition will be named the Susan Walk Burnett Journalism and Student Media Center in honor of the donors, subject to the Board of Trustees’ approval.

Tibetan Studies Students Create, Then Prepare to Destroy Intricate Sand Mandalas

Students gather around two tables in the front of the classroom, taking turns adding brightly colored sand to the chalked outlines of mandalas, or intricate geometric designs, that are meant to represent our universe. A soft, rhythmic scraping noise fills the room but it is not unpleasant. This is the sound of the chak-pur, a conical metal funnel with ridged sides. By moving a metal stick down the side of the chak-pur, the students can carefully control the distribution and placement of the sands they work with.

 

Researchers Examine How Arkansas.gov Can Better Serve State's Businesses

A new survey by communication researchers at the University of Arkansas revealed that Arkansas businesses frequently interact with state government online, especially for routine tasks, such as paying taxes or applying for permits. Attitudes that business people have about dealing with e-government vary according to business size, the survey showed, with the state’s smallest businesses – those with 10 or fewer full-time employees – preferring face-to-face interaction and other traditional means of conducting business with government agencies.

Research Examines Obstacles to Making Biofuel from Perennial Plants

 A University of Arkansas chemistry professor has received a $400,000 award from the National Science Foundation to investigate a roadblock in the harvesting of biomass from perennial plants for the purpose of creating a source of renewable energy. Cellulose fibrils are microfibers of inert carbohydrates within plants. They give wood its durability, for example. Through a process known as pretreatment, chemists separate these fibrils into individual carbohydrate chains that can be digested by enzymes. This process takes a long time, but Wang and other chemists are studying ways to speed it up.

Fulbright College Faculty Member Establishes Travel Abroad Fund for Students

Focusing on international education is not unusual at the university's J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences – after all the college's namesake is quoted as saying "international educational exchange is the most significant current project designed to continue the process of humanizing mankind to the point, we would hope, that men can learn to live in peace." But for the average student, studying abroad often comes with potentially prohibitive costs. And, if a student doesn't have the financial means, such essential educational opportunities can easily fall by the wayside.

U of A Geosciences Reaches Significant $500,000 Fundraising Milestone

The University of Arkansas Department of Geosciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Scienceshas succeeded in raising more than $500,000 to meet the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation Match for geosciences doctoral fellowships. This is the latest of several milestones the department has achieved over the last 10 years, including:

U of A Anthropologist Part of Team that Identified New Human Ancestor

A University of Arkansas biological anthropologist is part of the international team of scientists who verified that fossils found in a South African cave belong to a new species of human ancestor. The National Geographic Society and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, announced the discovery of the new species — Homo naledi – on Thursday, Sept. 10. The U of A has a partnership with Wits University and researchers here have been working on the project since the fossils were found in 2013.

U of A Evolutionary Biologist Awarded $540,000 by Simons Foundation

The Simons Foundation has awarded $540,000 to University of Arkansas biologist Andrew Alverson to study the evolution of microscopic marine algae in the Baltic Sea. Alverson is one of four researchers across the United States selected as a 2016 Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution.

U of A Leads Effort to Nurture Research Collaborations in Southeast Asia

The University of Arkansas is helping lead an effort to develop a bioscience network of scientists in the United States and Southeast Asia. The National Science Foundation recently awarded a $500,000 grant to establish the Food, Energy, Water and Ecosystems Resources Research Coordination Network, to build a team of minority and minority-serving faculty to strengthen research collaborations in the U.S. and enhance ties between U.S. faculty scientists and researchers working at institutions in Vietnam, Thailand and Malaysia.

U of A Researcher Links Mass Extinctions to 'Planet X'

Periodic mass extinctions on Earth, as indicated in the global fossil record, could be linked to a suspected ninth planet, according to research published by a faculty member of the University of Arkansas Department of Mathematical Sciences. Daniel Whitmire, a retired professor of astrophysics now working as a math instructor, published findings in the January issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society that the as yet undiscovered “Planet X” triggers comet showers linked to mass extinctions on Earth at intervals of approximately 27 million years.

Margulis Named Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences

Elizabeth Margulis, professor in the Department of Music, has been named a 2016 Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences. The honor incudes her participation in the Japanese-American Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium Dec. 2-4 in Irvine, California. Kavli Fellows are young scientists selected by the advisory board of the Kavli Foundation, members of the National Academy of Sciences and organizers of the Kavli/National Academy of Sciences Frontiers in Science Symposia series. The Kavli Foundation, based in Oxnard, California, supports scientific research, honors scientific achievement, and promotes public understanding of scientists and their work.

U of A Psychologist Working With State Law Enforcement on Eyewitness Policy

James Lampinen, distinguished professor of psychological science at the University of Arkansas, is partnering on a project with the Arkansas Association of Chiefs of Police to adopt a science-based model policy for Arkansas law enforcement officers to use that will reduce errors when collecting and evaluating eyewitness identification information. The association’s goal is for all Arkansas police departments and law enforcement agencies to adopt and use this model policy. Lampinen has provided feedback on the policy and is helping to promote it with law enforcement agencies around the state. He will also help train officers in how to effectively use the method.

Biological Anthropologist Awarded NSF for Fossil Research in Romania

A biological anthropologist at the University of Arkansas and her colleagues have been awarded a $30,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct fossil surveys in the Oltet River Valley of Romania. The award, a High-Risk Research in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (HRRBAA) grant, is designed to provide investigators with seed money to assess the feasibility of anthropological research that may rely on factors that are difficult to assess but which may have great payoffs, and if successful can lead to more extensive funding submissions.

Tibetan Studies Students Create, Then Prepare to Destroy Intricate Sand Mandalas

Students gather around two tables in the front of the classroom, taking turns adding brightly colored sand to the chalked outlines of mandalas, or intricate geometric designs, that are meant to represent our universe. A soft, rhythmic scraping noise fills the room but it is not unpleasant. This is the sound of the chak-pur, a conical metal funnel with ridged sides. By moving a metal stick down the side of the chak-pur, the students can carefully control the distribution and placement of the sands they work with.

 

Researchers Examine How Arkansas.gov Can Better Serve State's Businesses

A new survey by communication researchers at the University of Arkansas revealed that Arkansas businesses frequently interact with state government online, especially for routine tasks, such as paying taxes or applying for permits. Attitudes that business people have about dealing with e-government vary according to business size, the survey showed, with the state’s smallest businesses – those with 10 or fewer full-time employees – preferring face-to-face interaction and other traditional means of conducting business with government agencies.

Research Examines Obstacles to Making Biofuel from Perennial Plants

 A University of Arkansas chemistry professor has received a $400,000 award from the National Science Foundation to investigate a roadblock in the harvesting of biomass from perennial plants for the purpose of creating a source of renewable energy. Cellulose fibrils are microfibers of inert carbohydrates within plants. They give wood its durability, for example. Through a process known as pretreatment, chemists separate these fibrils into individual carbohydrate chains that can be digested by enzymes. This process takes a long time, but Wang and other chemists are studying ways to speed it up.

U of A Geosciences Reaches Significant $500,000 Fundraising Milestone

The University of Arkansas Department of Geosciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Scienceshas succeeded in raising more than $500,000 to meet the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation Match for geosciences doctoral fellowships. This is the latest of several milestones the department has achieved over the last 10 years, including:

U of A Anthropologist Part of Team that Identified New Human Ancestor

A University of Arkansas biological anthropologist is part of the international team of scientists who verified that fossils found in a South African cave belong to a new species of human ancestor. The National Geographic Society and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, announced the discovery of the new species — Homo naledi – on Thursday, Sept. 10. The U of A has a partnership with Wits University and researchers here have been working on the project since the fossils were found in 2013.

U of A Evolutionary Biologist Awarded $540,000 by Simons Foundation

The Simons Foundation has awarded $540,000 to University of Arkansas biologist Andrew Alverson to study the evolution of microscopic marine algae in the Baltic Sea. Alverson is one of four researchers across the United States selected as a 2016 Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution.

U of A Graduate Student Selected for DOE Science Research Award

Raymond Walter, a doctoral student in physics and mathematics, is the first student from the University of Arkansas selected for a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Research Award.  The award program will provide Walter a $3,000 monthly stipend for up to one year and a $2,000 travel allowance. The program gives doctoral candidates an opportunity to conduct a significant part of their doctoral dissertation research in collaboration with scientists at a Department of Energy national laboratory. Awardees are selected on the basis of a submitted research proposal aligned with one of the Office of Science Priority Research areas.

U of A Leads Effort to Nurture Research Collaborations in Southeast Asia

The University of Arkansas is helping lead an effort to develop a bioscience network of scientists in the United States and Southeast Asia. The National Science Foundation recently awarded a $500,000 grant to establish the Food, Energy, Water and Ecosystems Resources Research Coordination Network, to build a team of minority and minority-serving faculty to strengthen research collaborations in the U.S. and enhance ties between U.S. faculty scientists and researchers working at institutions in Vietnam, Thailand and Malaysia.

U of A Researcher Links Mass Extinctions to 'Planet X'

Periodic mass extinctions on Earth, as indicated in the global fossil record, could be linked to a suspected ninth planet, according to research published by a faculty member of the University of Arkansas Department of Mathematical Sciences. Daniel Whitmire, a retired professor of astrophysics now working as a math instructor, published findings in the January issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society that the as yet undiscovered “Planet X” triggers comet showers linked to mass extinctions on Earth at intervals of approximately 27 million years.

Fulbright College Chemistry and Mathematics Major Awarded Two National Fellowships

Undergraduate senior honors chemistry and mathematics major Craig McLean recently received not one, but two prestigious national fellowships, one from the National Science Foundation and a second from the National GEM Consortium. "Craig is the first honors undergraduate researcher I've worked with who took basic skills in protein biochemistry that he learned in my laboratory and applied them to the development of his own original research project," said Paul D. Adams, McLean's honors thesis adviser and an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and in the Cellular and Molecular Biology Program. "I found this to be remarkable to say the least!"

Margulis Named Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences

Elizabeth Margulis, professor in the Department of Music, has been named a 2016 Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences. The honor incudes her participation in the Japanese-American Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium Dec. 2-4 in Irvine, California. Kavli Fellows are young scientists selected by the advisory board of the Kavli Foundation, members of the National Academy of Sciences and organizers of the Kavli/National Academy of Sciences Frontiers in Science Symposia series. The Kavli Foundation, based in Oxnard, California, supports scientific research, honors scientific achievement, and promotes public understanding of scientists and their work.

Biological Anthropologist Awarded NSF for Fossil Research in Romania

A biological anthropologist at the University of Arkansas and her colleagues have been awarded a $30,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct fossil surveys in the Oltet River Valley of Romania. The award, a High-Risk Research in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (HRRBAA) grant, is designed to provide investigators with seed money to assess the feasibility of anthropological research that may rely on factors that are difficult to assess but which may have great payoffs, and if successful can lead to more extensive funding submissions.

 

Alumna Discusses How Psychology Degree Has Opened Career Doors

Pursuing a degree in psychology can lead to many career opportunities, many of which are not typically considered by students wishing to study the subject. Brandie Patton, an alumna of the Department of Psychological Science in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, is an excellent example of this. She currently works for Wal-Mart Stores Inc. in GISAT, which stands for Global Investigations, Security Aviation and Travel.

Fulbright College Faculty Member Establishes Travel Abroad Fund for Students

Focusing on international education is not unusual at the university's J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences – after all the college's namesake is quoted as saying "international educational exchange is the most significant current project designed to continue the process of humanizing mankind to the point, we would hope, that men can learn to live in peace." But for the average student, studying abroad often comes with potentially prohibitive costs. And, if a student doesn't have the financial means, such essential educational opportunities can easily fall by the wayside.

U of A Anthropologist Part of Team that Identified New Human Ancestor

A University of Arkansas biological anthropologist is part of the international team of scientists who verified that fossils found in a South African cave belong to a new species of human ancestor. The National Geographic Society and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, announced the discovery of the new species — Homo naledi – on Thursday, Sept. 10. The U of A has a partnership with Wits University and researchers here have been working on the project since the fossils were found in 2013.

U of A Graduate Student Creates Guide for the USDA and EPA Aimed to Reduce Food Waste

It’s a difficult statistic to stomach, but a staggering 31 to 40 percent of food produced in the U.S. ends up in landfills each year.  With numbers like these, Melissa Terry, a graduate student in the Master of Public Administration and Nonprofit Studies program in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Political Science, knew something needed to change. 

U of A Psychologist Working With State Law Enforcement on Eyewitness Policy

James Lampinen, distinguished professor of psychological science at the University of Arkansas, is partnering on a project with the Arkansas Association of Chiefs of Police to adopt a science-based model policy for Arkansas law enforcement officers to use that will reduce errors when collecting and evaluating eyewitness identification information. The association’s goal is for all Arkansas police departments and law enforcement agencies to adopt and use this model policy. Lampinen has provided feedback on the policy and is helping to promote it with law enforcement agencies around the state. He will also help train officers in how to effectively use the method.

Biological Anthropologist Awarded NSF for Fossil Research in Romania

A biological anthropologist at the University of Arkansas and her colleagues have been awarded a $30,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct fossil surveys in the Oltet River Valley of Romania. The award, a High-Risk Research in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (HRRBAA) grant, is designed to provide investigators with seed money to assess the feasibility of anthropological research that may rely on factors that are difficult to assess but which may have great payoffs, and if successful can lead to more extensive funding submissions.

 

Alumna Discusses How Psychology Degree Has Opened Career Doors

Pursuing a degree in psychology can lead to many career opportunities, many of which are not typically considered by students wishing to study the subject. Brandie Patton, an alumna of the Department of Psychological Science in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, is an excellent example of this. She currently works for Wal-Mart Stores Inc. in GISAT, which stands for Global Investigations, Security Aviation and Travel.

M.F.A. Theatre Directing Alumna Earns Prestigious Assistantship

Kholoud Sawaf, who earned her M.F.A. in theatre directing last August, has been awarded an Artistic Assistantship in Directing at the Tony Award-winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Kholoud will be in residency for six weeks at the festival, with responsibilities including assisting on a production of the new comedy Vietgone, by Qui Nguyen. This highly competitive award includes housing, round-trip airfare, and a stipend.

Bennett Scholarship Gift Supports Students in Two Colleges

A gift from the late Jim and Betty Bennett is being used to create the James Harold and Betty Jo Bennett Endowed Scholarship for undergraduate students at the University of Arkansas. The late Jim and Betty Bennett were native Arkansans, and both were distinguished graduates of the university. As a nod to the couple’s majors, the scholarship will benefit two students each year – one studying chemical engineering in the College of Engineering and one studying mathematical sciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

Gift Creates New Addition in Kimpel Hall for Journalism, Student Media

University of Arkansas students involved with the Department of Journalism and student media will have a new venue created for them in Kimpel Hall, thanks to a gift from alumna Susan Walk Burnett and her husband, Rusty Burnett, of Houston. The couple has pledged $1 million for a new addition to the second floor of Kimpel Hall that will include an integrated newsroom where students from all journalism disciplines will converge. A new UATV television studio will also open to a view of one of the busiest hubs on campus. The addition will be named the Susan Walk Burnett Journalism and Student Media Center in honor of the donors, subject to the Board of Trustees’ approval.

 

Alumna Discusses How Psychology Degree Has Opened Career Doors

Pursuing a degree in psychology can lead to many career opportunities, many of which are not typically considered by students wishing to study the subject. Brandie Patton, an alumna of the Department of Psychological Science in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, is an excellent example of this. She currently works for Wal-Mart Stores Inc. in GISAT, which stands for Global Investigations, Security Aviation and Travel.

Latino Youth Visit Campus, Hone Spanish and English Language Skills

Jose Flores perched on a stool in a Discovery Hall chemistry lab, pulled on a pair of oversized goggles and grinned at his lab partner. "I'm a scientist!" the 12-year-old exclaimed. The duo mashed chopped strawberries with dish detergent, hot water and salt, then filtered the paste through mini coffee filters, and trickled ice cold ethanol into the test tube. Ten minutes later, a whitish-colored layer floated between the pink liquid and the clear ethanol. Jose dipped a wire loop into that layer and pulled out a sticky bead of strawberry DNA.

Human-Centered Design Class Creates Artifacts to Help Arkansas' Marshallese

Being pulled over by a police officer can already be a nerve-wracking experience. Do you have your license and registration handy? Do you know why you were stopped? Now, imagine you don't speak the same language as the officer. How would you communicate? How will you understand what's happening?

U of A Graduate Student Creates Guide for the USDA and EPA Aimed to Reduce Food Waste

It’s a difficult statistic to stomach, but a staggering 31 to 40 percent of food produced in the U.S. ends up in landfills each year.  With numbers like these, Melissa Terry, a graduate student in the Master of Public Administration and Nonprofit Studies program in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Political Science, knew something needed to change. 

U of A Psychologist Working With State Law Enforcement on Eyewitness Policy

James Lampinen, distinguished professor of psychological science at the University of Arkansas, is partnering on a project with the Arkansas Association of Chiefs of Police to adopt a science-based model policy for Arkansas law enforcement officers to use that will reduce errors when collecting and evaluating eyewitness identification information. The association’s goal is for all Arkansas police departments and law enforcement agencies to adopt and use this model policy. Lampinen has provided feedback on the policy and is helping to promote it with law enforcement agencies around the state. He will also help train officers in how to effectively use the method.

Students Fuse Visual and Culinary Arts to Create a 'Kiln-to-Table' Experience

Ceramics and graphic design students from two University of Arkansas art classes are joining forces with a top local culinary team to create an unforgettable kiln-to-table dining experience for Northwest Arkansas art and food aficionados alike. The Sunday, Dec. 11 event – Artisans at the Depot: A Kiln to Table Experience – will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the first of four gourmet courses prepared by Chef Patrick Lane at Arsaga’s at The Depot, 548 W. Dickson Street in Fayetteville.

Tibetan Studies Students Create, Then Prepare to Destroy Intricate Sand Mandalas

Students gather around two tables in the front of the classroom, taking turns adding brightly colored sand to the chalked outlines of mandalas, or intricate geometric designs, that are meant to represent our universe. A soft, rhythmic scraping noise fills the room but it is not unpleasant. This is the sound of the chak-pur, a conical metal funnel with ridged sides. By moving a metal stick down the side of the chak-pur, the students can carefully control the distribution and placement of the sands they work with.

 

Physics Department Recognized Nationally for Physics Teacher Preparation

Only 12 universities in the nation – including the University of Arkansas – are being recognized this year by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) for graduating five or more well-prepared physics teachers in the past academic year. Recent estimates by the organization indicate that less than half of all high school physics courses are taught by a well-qualified teacher with a degree in physics. Universities like the U of A that are striving to reverse this trend are being inducted into the group's 5+ Club.

U of A Bands Commits Over $1 Million in Scholarships to Arkansas Students

Becoming part of “the Best in Sight and Sound” just got even better – now Arkansas students who want to study music at the University of Arkansas or join one of the U of A bands can receive a $5,000 annual scholarship to help them achieve these goals. Starting in fall 2016, the newly founded Arkansas Music Initiative will commit more than $1 million in scholarship support over the next five years for students planning to study music in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

Researchers Examine How Arkansas.gov Can Better Serve State's Businesses

A new survey by communication researchers at the University of Arkansas revealed that Arkansas businesses frequently interact with state government online, especially for routine tasks, such as paying taxes or applying for permits. Attitudes that business people have about dealing with e-government vary according to business size, the survey showed, with the state’s smallest businesses – those with 10 or fewer full-time employees – preferring face-to-face interaction and other traditional means of conducting business with government agencies.

Alumna Discusses How Psychology Degree Has Opened Career Doors

Pursuing a degree in psychology can lead to many career opportunities, many of which are not typically considered by students wishing to study the subject. Brandie Patton, an alumna of the Department of Psychological Science in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, is an excellent example of this. She currently works for Wal-Mart Stores Inc. in GISAT, which stands for Global Investigations, Security Aviation and Travel.

M.F.A. Theatre Directing Alumna Earns Prestigious Assistantship

Kholoud Sawaf, who earned her M.F.A. in theatre directing last August, has been awarded an Artistic Assistantship in Directing at the Tony Award-winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Kholoud will be in residency for six weeks at the festival, with responsibilities including assisting on a production of the new comedy Vietgone, by Qui Nguyen. This highly competitive award includes housing, round-trip airfare, and a stipend.

Research Examines Obstacles to Making Biofuel from Perennial Plants

 A University of Arkansas chemistry professor has received a $400,000 award from the National Science Foundation to investigate a roadblock in the harvesting of biomass from perennial plants for the purpose of creating a source of renewable energy. Cellulose fibrils are microfibers of inert carbohydrates within plants. They give wood its durability, for example. Through a process known as pretreatment, chemists separate these fibrils into individual carbohydrate chains that can be digested by enzymes. This process takes a long time, but Wang and other chemists are studying ways to speed it up.

Latino Youth Visit Campus, Hone Spanish and English Language Skills

Jose Flores perched on a stool in a Discovery Hall chemistry lab, pulled on a pair of oversized goggles and grinned at his lab partner. "I'm a scientist!" the 12-year-old exclaimed. The duo mashed chopped strawberries with dish detergent, hot water and salt, then filtered the paste through mini coffee filters, and trickled ice cold ethanol into the test tube. Ten minutes later, a whitish-colored layer floated between the pink liquid and the clear ethanol. Jose dipped a wire loop into that layer and pulled out a sticky bead of strawberry DNA.

High School Scholars Visit U of A to Gain Geosciences and STEM Skills

This week, 25 high school juniors from across the nation are visiting the University of Arkansas to take part in the Math, Science and Engineering Academy pre-college outreach program – known as MSEA – in partnership with Fort Valley State University in Georgia. Geosciences professor Steve Boss is Kvamme's co-coordinator for the program, and classes are taught by Boss, geosciences emeritus John Van Brahana and electrical engineeringassistant department head Robert Saunders from the College of Engineering.

Fulbright College Faculty Member Establishes Travel Abroad Fund for Students

Focusing on international education is not unusual at the university's J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences – after all the college's namesake is quoted as saying "international educational exchange is the most significant current project designed to continue the process of humanizing mankind to the point, we would hope, that men can learn to live in peace." But for the average student, studying abroad often comes with potentially prohibitive costs. And, if a student doesn't have the financial means, such essential educational opportunities can easily fall by the wayside.

Bennett Scholarship Gift Supports Students in Two Colleges

A gift from the late Jim and Betty Bennett is being used to create the James Harold and Betty Jo Bennett Endowed Scholarship for undergraduate students at the University of Arkansas. The late Jim and Betty Bennett were native Arkansans, and both were distinguished graduates of the university. As a nod to the couple’s majors, the scholarship will benefit two students each year – one studying chemical engineering in the College of Engineering and one studying mathematical sciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

Gift Creates New Addition in Kimpel Hall for Journalism, Student Media

University of Arkansas students involved with the Department of Journalism and student media will have a new venue created for them in Kimpel Hall, thanks to a gift from alumna Susan Walk Burnett and her husband, Rusty Burnett, of Houston. The couple has pledged $1 million for a new addition to the second floor of Kimpel Hall that will include an integrated newsroom where students from all journalism disciplines will converge. A new UATV television studio will also open to a view of one of the busiest hubs on campus. The addition will be named the Susan Walk Burnett Journalism and Student Media Center in honor of the donors, subject to the Board of Trustees’ approval.

Jessamy Eve Samuels Memorial Scholarship Honors Her Life and Legacy

A wicked sense of humor, a keen interest in human rights and politics, a sparkling personality and a quick wit best described Jessamy Eve Samuels – and it’s with these qualities in mind that her family and friends recently established the Jessamy Eve Samuels Memorial Scholarship in her honor. Jessamy passed away in May 2016 after a tragic fall while hiking at Hawksbill Crag in Newton County, devastating those close to the vibrant 19-year-old University of Arkansas freshman. She was an honors student in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and was interested in studying anthropology and journalism. Her death occurred a year to the day after Jessamy graduated from Rogers High School with Distinguished Honors.

U of A Geosciences Reaches Significant $500,000 Fundraising Milestone

The University of Arkansas Department of Geosciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Scienceshas succeeded in raising more than $500,000 to meet the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation Match for geosciences doctoral fellowships. This is the latest of several milestones the department has achieved over the last 10 years, including:

U of A Anthropologist Part of Team that Identified New Human Ancestor

A University of Arkansas biological anthropologist is part of the international team of scientists who verified that fossils found in a South African cave belong to a new species of human ancestor. The National Geographic Society and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, announced the discovery of the new species — Homo naledi – on Thursday, Sept. 10. The U of A has a partnership with Wits University and researchers here have been working on the project since the fossils were found in 2013.

Human-Centered Design Class Creates Artifacts to Help Arkansas' Marshallese

Being pulled over by a police officer can already be a nerve-wracking experience. Do you have your license and registration handy? Do you know why you were stopped? Now, imagine you don't speak the same language as the officer. How would you communicate? How will you understand what's happening?

U of A Evolutionary Biologist Awarded $540,000 by Simons Foundation

The Simons Foundation has awarded $540,000 to University of Arkansas biologist Andrew Alverson to study the evolution of microscopic marine algae in the Baltic Sea. Alverson is one of four researchers across the United States selected as a 2016 Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution.

U of A Graduate Student Selected for DOE Science Research Award

Raymond Walter, a doctoral student in physics and mathematics, is the first student from the University of Arkansas selected for a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Research Award.  The award program will provide Walter a $3,000 monthly stipend for up to one year and a $2,000 travel allowance. The program gives doctoral candidates an opportunity to conduct a significant part of their doctoral dissertation research in collaboration with scientists at a Department of Energy national laboratory. Awardees are selected on the basis of a submitted research proposal aligned with one of the Office of Science Priority Research areas.

U of A Leads Effort to Nurture Research Collaborations in Southeast Asia

The University of Arkansas is helping lead an effort to develop a bioscience network of scientists in the United States and Southeast Asia. The National Science Foundation recently awarded a $500,000 grant to establish the Food, Energy, Water and Ecosystems Resources Research Coordination Network, to build a team of minority and minority-serving faculty to strengthen research collaborations in the U.S. and enhance ties between U.S. faculty scientists and researchers working at institutions in Vietnam, Thailand and Malaysia.

U of A Researcher Links Mass Extinctions to 'Planet X'

Periodic mass extinctions on Earth, as indicated in the global fossil record, could be linked to a suspected ninth planet, according to research published by a faculty member of the University of Arkansas Department of Mathematical Sciences. Daniel Whitmire, a retired professor of astrophysics now working as a math instructor, published findings in the January issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society that the as yet undiscovered “Planet X” triggers comet showers linked to mass extinctions on Earth at intervals of approximately 27 million years.

Fulbright College Chemistry and Mathematics Major Awarded Two National Fellowships

Undergraduate senior honors chemistry and mathematics major Craig McLean recently received not one, but two prestigious national fellowships, one from the National Science Foundation and a second from the National GEM Consortium. "Craig is the first honors undergraduate researcher I've worked with who took basic skills in protein biochemistry that he learned in my laboratory and applied them to the development of his own original research project," said Paul D. Adams, McLean's honors thesis adviser and an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and in the Cellular and Molecular Biology Program. "I found this to be remarkable to say the least!"

U of A Graduate Student Creates Guide for the USDA and EPA Aimed to Reduce Food Waste

It’s a difficult statistic to stomach, but a staggering 31 to 40 percent of food produced in the U.S. ends up in landfills each year.  With numbers like these, Melissa Terry, a graduate student in the Master of Public Administration and Nonprofit Studies program in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Political Science, knew something needed to change. 

Margulis Named Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences

Elizabeth Margulis, professor in the Department of Music, has been named a 2016 Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences. The honor incudes her participation in the Japanese-American Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium Dec. 2-4 in Irvine, California. Kavli Fellows are young scientists selected by the advisory board of the Kavli Foundation, members of the National Academy of Sciences and organizers of the Kavli/National Academy of Sciences Frontiers in Science Symposia series. The Kavli Foundation, based in Oxnard, California, supports scientific research, honors scientific achievement, and promotes public understanding of scientists and their work.

U of A Psychologist Working With State Law Enforcement on Eyewitness Policy

James Lampinen, distinguished professor of psychological science at the University of Arkansas, is partnering on a project with the Arkansas Association of Chiefs of Police to adopt a science-based model policy for Arkansas law enforcement officers to use that will reduce errors when collecting and evaluating eyewitness identification information. The association’s goal is for all Arkansas police departments and law enforcement agencies to adopt and use this model policy. Lampinen has provided feedback on the policy and is helping to promote it with law enforcement agencies around the state. He will also help train officers in how to effectively use the method.

Biological Anthropologist Awarded NSF for Fossil Research in Romania

A biological anthropologist at the University of Arkansas and her colleagues have been awarded a $30,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct fossil surveys in the Oltet River Valley of Romania. The award, a High-Risk Research in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (HRRBAA) grant, is designed to provide investigators with seed money to assess the feasibility of anthropological research that may rely on factors that are difficult to assess but which may have great payoffs, and if successful can lead to more extensive funding submissions.

Students Fuse Visual and Culinary Arts to Create a 'Kiln-to-Table' Experience

Ceramics and graphic design students from two University of Arkansas art classes are joining forces with a top local culinary team to create an unforgettable kiln-to-table dining experience for Northwest Arkansas art and food aficionados alike. The Sunday, Dec. 11 event – Artisans at the Depot: A Kiln to Table Experience – will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the first of four gourmet courses prepared by Chef Patrick Lane at Arsaga’s at The Depot, 548 W. Dickson Street in Fayetteville.

Tibetan Studies Students Create, Then Prepare to Destroy Intricate Sand Mandalas

Students gather around two tables in the front of the classroom, taking turns adding brightly colored sand to the chalked outlines of mandalas, or intricate geometric designs, that are meant to represent our universe. A soft, rhythmic scraping noise fills the room but it is not unpleasant. This is the sound of the chak-pur, a conical metal funnel with ridged sides. By moving a metal stick down the side of the chak-pur, the students can carefully control the distribution and placement of the sands they work with.