Current Course Offerings

Summer 2021

An introduction to the field of physical anthropology using human evolution as a unifying concept.  Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate evolution, and human variation and adaptation.  Corequisite: ANTH 1011L. 

Instructor: Terhune

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology.  Corequisite: ANTH 1013.  Instructor: Graduate Teaching Assistants

Study of health and medicine within cultural contexts, including attention to cross-cultural healers and healing systems. Special emphasis on biomedicine as a cultural system. Instructor: Marion

This course explores personal, social and cultural construtions and performances of the body and identy, highlighting key intersections of embodiment including gender, race, sexuality and abilities. Instructor: Marion

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Instructor:  Faculty

Practical field and laboratory experience in archeological research.  Instructor: Kowalski

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology.May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.  Instructor: Faculty

Individual research at graduate level on clearly defined problems or problem areas.  Instructor:  Faculty

Practical field and laboratory experience in archeological reseach. Instructor: Kowalski

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology.  Instructor:  Faculty

 Instructor:  Faculty

 Instructor:  Faculty

 

Fall 2021

An introduction to the field of physical anthropology using human evolution as a unifying concept.  Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate evolution, and human variation and adaptation.  Corequisite: ANTH 1011L. 

Instructor: Delezene & Villaseñor

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology.  Corequisite: ANTH 1013.  Instructor: Graduate Teaching Assistants

An introduction to the field of physical anthropology using human evolution as a unifying concept. Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate evolution, and human variation and adaptation. Corequisite: ANTH 1011L.  Instructor: Delezene

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology. Corequisite: ANTH 1013This course is equivalent to ANTH 1011L. Instructor: Graduate Teaching Assistants

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality: comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture. Corequisite: Drill component. Instructor: Koziol

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality; comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture. This course is equivalent to ANTH 1023. Instructor: Graduate Teaching Students

Archaeology studies the human past through contextual analysis of artifacts, archaeological sites, and landscapes. This course introduces archaeological methods and theories, significant discoveries and current debates in the discipline. Corequisite: Lab component. Instructor: Stoner

Study of the tradional lifeways and prehistoric backgrounds of Indians living in the Southern United States, including Arkansas. Instructor: Kowalski

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of human osteology. Corequisite: ANTH 3423. Instructor: Plavcan

Study of the human skeleton, identification of bones, allometric growth, sexual dimorphism, osteological genetic inheritance and environmental stresses. Lectures and demonstration. Corequisite: ANTH 3421L.  Instructor: Plavcan

A study of hominid from evolution to the present, including trends in the comparative primate evolution and functional development of human form as a result of cultural and biological interaction. Instructor: Ungar

This course explores personal, social and cultural constructions and performances  of the body and identity, highlighting key intersections of embodiment including gender, race, sexuality and abilities. This course is cross-listed with GNST 3583-001. Instructor: Maron

Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

Myths, Mysteries, Manipulation                                                 Instructor: Stoner
Evolution of the Human Mating System                                Instructor: Plavcan

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Instructor:  Faculty

Detailed consideration of anthropological theory through study of its historical development. The research paper in this course fulfills the Fulbright College research paper requirement for anthropology majors. Instructor: Natarajan

This class explores the use of photographic images as both and representational tools in anthropological research, emphasizing the ethical, theoretical, and methodological issues involved. Instructor: Marion

Survey of the development and evolution of ethnographic film, based on class screenings to build familiarity, vocabulary, and literacy with this branch of visual anthropology.  Instructor: Marion

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology.May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.  Instructor: Faculty

Introduction to the study of the human dentition including its anatomy, morphology, growth and development, and histology.  Instructor: Paul

Theory, data stuctures, algorithms, and techniques behind raster-based geographical information systems. Through labortory exercises and lectures mulitdisiplinary applications are examined in database creation, remotely sensed data handling, evelation models, and resource models using boolean, map algebra, and other methods. This course if cross-listed with GEOS 4553. Instructor: Vining

This course will focus on describing the evolutionary history of mammals, a group of vertebrates that include over 5,000 species in 29 orders, and will provide and overview of living species and their identifiying  features. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 and ANTH 1011L or BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L or instructor consent. Instructor: Terhune

Individual research at graduate level on clearly defined problems or problem areas.  Instructor:  Faculty

An interdisciplinary study of the Quaternary Period including dating methods, deposits, soils, climates, tectonics, and human adaptation. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. 
This course is cross-listed with ENDY 5051 Instructor: Villaseñor

Review of the nature and history of cultural anthropology; recent theories and practical implications and applications of various methods of aquiring, analyzing and interpreting cultural anthropological data. Instructor: Erickson

Review of the nature and history of biological anthropology; recent theories and practical implication and application of catious methods of aquiring, analyzing and interpreting data. Instructor: Plavcan

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology.  Instructor:  Faculty

 Instructor:  Faculty

 Instructor:  Faculty

 

SPRING 2022

An introduction to the field of physical anthropology using human evolution as a unifying concept.  Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate evolution, and human variation and adaptation.  Corequisite: ANTH 1011L. 

Instructor: Delezene & Terhune

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology.  Corequisite: ANTH 1013.  Instructor: Graduate Teaching Assistants

An introduction to the field of physical anthropology using human evolution as a unifying concept. Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate evolution, and human variation and adaptation. Corequisite: ANTH 1011L.  Instructor: Delezene

This course explores personal, social and cultural construtions and performances of the body and identy, highlighting key intersections of embodiment including gender, race, sexuality and abilities. Instructor: Marion

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality: comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture. Corequisite: Drill component. Instructor: Koziol

Archaeology studies the human past through contextual analysis of artifacts, archaeological sites, and landscapes. This course introduces archaeological methods and theories, significant discoveries and current debates in the discipline. Corequisite: Lab component. Instructor: Samuelsen

Study of the field of archeology including method, theory, analysis and interpretation with substantive worldwide examples. Prerequisite: ANTH 1033. Instructor: Kowalski

This course will review the anatomy of the human body, comparing this anatomy with primates, mammals, and vertebrates, and it will consider how the major features of the human body emerged throughout evolution. 
This course is cross-listed with BIOL 3043.  Instructor: Terhune  

An exploration of rituals, symbols, and rules that shape religious life. Religion is viewed broadly, considering activities that invoke powers beyond the reach of ordinary senses. Examining a variety of cultures, we explore what people say and do as they participate in activities such as magic, healing, pilgrimage, and contemporary religious movements.  Instructor: D'Alisera

Examines contemporary implications of Latin America's unique religious heritage. An exploration of multiple Latin American religious traditions, with sustained focus on key theoretical concerns: conversion, vernacular vs. orthodox expressions, the blending of indigenous and European cosmologies, devotion and ritual, and the articulation of ethnic, gendered, and religious identities.  Instructor: Erickson

Study of health and medicine within cultural contexts, including attention to cross-cultural healers and healing systems. Special emphasis on biomedicine as a cultural system.  Instructor: Marion

Honors thesis. Prerequisite: Junior standing.  May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit. Instructor: Facutly

Study of the analysis and interpretation of archeological mortuary remains and sites. Key archeological and anthropological sources that have influenced major theoretical developments are reviewed.  Instructor: Paul

Anthropological perspectives on the study of relationships among human populations and their ecosystems. Instructor: Vining

An exploration of the interplay between Latino/a, Mexican, Anglo, and Native American identities and cultures along the U.S.-Mexico border. Course examines identity formation, hybridity, social tension, marginalization, race and gender, from an anthropological perspective, paying special attention to the border as theoretical construct as well as material reality. Instructor: Erickson

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology.  May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit. Instructor: Faculty

Introduction to the biology of the order of Primates. This course considers the comparative anatomy, behavioral ecology and paleontology of our nearest living relatives. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 (or BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L). 
This course is cross-listed with BIOL 4613.  Instructor: Ungar

Research, discussion, and projects focusing on a variety of topics.  May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

Racisms and Race                                                                    Instructor:  Ram Natarajan
Ancient Cities                                                                             Instructor: Wesley Stoner
Hominin Paleobiology                                                          Instructor: 
Lucas Delezene
Ecology of the Past                                                                  Instructor:
Amelia Villasenor

Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.
War, Migration & Refugees                                                Instructor: Ted Swedenburg

Individual research at graduate level on clearly defined problems or problem areas. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit. Instructor: Faculty

Graduate level seminar with varied emphasis on topics relating to cultural anthropology. May be repeated for degree credit.
Hominin Paleobiology                                                           Instructor: Lucas Delezene

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both ANTH 448V and ANTH 548V.  May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit. Instructor: Faculty

Research, discussion, and projects focusing on a variety of topics. Credit will not be given for both ANTH 4903 and ANTH 5903.  May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.
Material Culture                                                                        Instructor: JoAnn D'Alisera
Racisms and Race                                                                      Instructor: Ram Natarajan
Ecology of the Past                                                                   Instructor: Amelia Villasenor

Master's Thesis.May be repeated for degree credit. 1 - 6 credit hours. Instructor:  Faculty

Internship. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit. Instructor:  Faculty

Doctoral Dissertation. May be repeated for degree credit. 1 - 18 hours. Instructor:  Faculty