Current Course Offerings

Spring 2019

An introduction to the field of physical anthropology using human evolution as a unifying concept.  Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate evolution, and human variation and adaptation.  Corequisite: ANTH 1011L.  Instructor: Delezene & Terhune

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology.  Corequisite: ANTH 1013.  Instructor: Graduate Teaching Assistants

 

An introduction to the field of physical anthropology using human evolution as a unifying concept.  Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate evolution, and human variation and adaptation.  Corequisite: ANTH 1011M.  Instructor:  Graduate Teaching Assistants

 

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology.  Corequisite: ANTH 1013H.  Instructor:  Graduate Teaching Assistants

 

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality: comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture.  Corequisite: Drill component.  Instructor:  Koziol

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality: comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture.  Instructor:  Graduate Teaching Assistants

Archaeology studies the human past through contextual analysis of artifacts, archaeological sites, and landscapes.  This course introduces archaeological methods and theories, significant discoveries and current debates in the discipline.  Corequisite: Lab component.  Instructor:  Stoner

Survey of the prehistoric and early historic cultures of the Americas, Asia, and Africa.  Instructor:  Kay

Study of the field of archeology including method, theory, analysis and interpretation with substantive worldwide examples.  Prerequisite: ANTH 1033.  Instructor:  Stoner

Explores multiple aspects of Ancient Egyptian civilization including chronology, art, religion, literature and daily life.  Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Instructor:  Morey

This course will review the anatomy of the human body, comparing this anatomy with primates, mammals, and vertebrates, and it will consider how the major features of the human body emerged throughout evolution.  Instructor:  Terhune

An introduction to the methods and theory underlying the full range of geographic information science and collateral areas - including GNSS, remote sensing, cadastral, spatial demographics and others.  Instructor:  Limp

Covers a special topic or issue.  May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

Archeological Views of Climate Change - Instructor:  Kvamme

Language Pol in Sub-Sahara Africa - Instructor:  Irungu

Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in anthropology).  May be repeated for degree credit.

The Darwin Course - Instructor:  McComas

 

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Instructor:  Faculty

An exploration of the interplay between Latino/a, Mexican, Anglo, and Native American identities and cultures along the U.S.-Mexico border. Course examines identity formation, hybridity, social tension, marginalization, race and gender, from an anthropological perspective, paying special attention to the border as theoretical construct as well as material reality.  Instructor:  Erickson

Concentrated discussion of management problems relative to cultural resources, including review and interpretation of relevant federal legislation, research vs. planning needs, public involvement and sponsor planning, and assessment of resources relative to scientific needs. No field training involved; discussion will deal only with administrative, legal and scientific management problems.   Instructor:  Brandon

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology.May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.  Instructor: Faculty

Introduction to the study of the human dentition including its anatomy, morphology, growth and development, and histology.  Instructor: Rose

Unlike conventional GIS courses that focus on studying "where", this course will teach students to address beyond "where" using various GIS analysis and modeling techniques to explore "why" and "how". The course will provide theoretical and methodological reviews of the principles of cartographic modeling and multi-criteria decision-making.  Instructor:  Aly

ntroductory statistics course for anthropology students examines probability theory, nature of anthropological data, data graphics, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, test for means and variances, categorical and rank methods, ANOVA, correlation and regression. Lectures focus on theory methods; utilize anthropological data and a statistical software laboratory.  Instructor:  Kvamme

Research, discussion, and projects focusing on a variety of topics.

Hominin Paleoecology - Instructor:  Delezene

Archaeometry - Instructor:  Stoner

Covers a special topic or issue.

Music & Resistance in the Middle East - Instructor:  Swedenburg

Mass Media in the Middle East - Instructor:  Ozkan

 

Individual research at graduate level on clearly defined problems or problem areas.  Instructor:  Faculty

 An exploration of the interplay between Latino/a, Mexican, Anglo, and Native American identities and cultures along the U.S.-Mexico border. Course examines identity formation, hybridity, social tension, marginalization, race and gender, from an anthropological perspective, paying special attention to the border as theoretical construct as well as material reality.  Instructor:  Erickson

Theory and practice of describin, analyzing, and reporting upon archeological materials.

Archaeometry - Instructor:  Stoner

Concentrated discussion of management problems relative to cultural resources, including review and interpretation of relevant federal legislation, research vs. planning needs, public involvement and sponsor planning, and assessment of resources relative to scientific needs. No field training involved; discussion will deal only with administrative, legal, and scientific management problems.  Instructor:  Brandon

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology.  Instructor:  Faculty

Introduction to the study of the human dentition including its anatomy, morphology, growth and development, and histology.   Instructor:  Rose

Unlike conventional GIS courses that focus on studying "where", this course will teach students to address beyond "where" using various GIS analysis and modeling techniques to explore "why" and "how". The course will provide theoretical and methodological reviews of the principles of cartographic modeling and multi-criteria decision-making.  Instructor:  Aly

Introductory statistics course for anthropology students examines probability theory, nature of anthropological data, data graphics, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, test for means and variances, categorical and rank methods, ANOVA, correlation and regression. Lectures focus on theory methods; utilize anthropological data and a statistical software laboratory.  Instructor:  Kvamme

Research, discussion, and projects focusing on a variety of topics

Hominin Paleoecology - Instructor: Delezene

 Instructor:  Faculty

This course examines the complex interrelationships between human societies and the natural environment. Drawing on diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in archaeology, ethnography, history, geography, and palaeo-environmental studies, readings and discussion will explore the co-production of social and environmental systems over time.   Instructor:  Vining

 Instructor:  Faculty