Funding

The UAHC will provide five grants of up to $1000 for humanities faculty every other year to engage a consultant to help with grant, book, or other research proposals.

The UAHC adheres to the definition of humanities as specified by the National Foundation of the Arts and Humanities Act, which defines humanities as including, but not limited to “the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of the social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life.” The National Endowment for the Humanities clarifies that performing and creative arts or empirical social science are not humanities.

  • Funds can be for consultants for grant writing, book proposal, or field specific work

  • Funds must be used w/in 2 years

  • Awardees will acknowledge UAHC in all publications or research outputs and provide

    copies to UAHC

  • Faculty of all standing are encouraged to apply

    Interested parties should provide a proposal for consideration by the selection committee with:

  • A narrative of the project of no more than 1000 words including:
    o title and description of the project and expected research deliverable
    o reason for needing a consultant
    o specifics regarding consultant and their qualifications for furthering the work

  • A curriculum vita for the applicant

  • A budget detailing estimated fee

  • A statement on current RIF funds balance

    Due dates for applications are March 1, 2021 and 2023.
    Proposals will be reviewed by a sub-committee of the UAHC Steering Committee

 The UAHC seeks applications every other fiscal year for larger, humanities-focused, community- based events (University and regional) for grants of up to $2500. These events should include humanities and interdisciplinary content, focus on outreach to a broad constituency, and include multiple streams of publicity (internal/external/online/print/radio).
  • Preference will be for events that engage the larger public.

  • Funds must be used w/in 2 years.

  • Awardees will acknowledge the UAHC in all publicity.

  • Faculty of all standing are encouraged to apply.

    Interested parties should provide a proposal that includes:

  • A description of no more than 500 words including o title for the event

    o participants
    o intended venue
    o intended audience
    o publicity plan with targets and timeline (please see Fulbright guidelines)

  • A detailed budget for all aspects of the event.

  • A current curriculum vita for organizer(s)

    Due dates for applications are March 1, 2021 and 2023.
    Proposals will be reviewed by a sub-committee of the UAHC Steering Committee

 

The Steering Committee of the University of Arkansas Humanities Center (UAHC) has approved a total of three publishing subvention grants of up to $2000 each. Two remain for Spring 2021 distribution. These funds can be used to defray production costs associated with humanities research publications or scholarly products including obtaining publication rights for art works, purchase of high-resolution visuals, translation costs, creation of maps by a third party, design of graphs or charts by a third party, or other field specific expenses with proper justification.

  • Awardees will acknowledge UAHC in all publications and provide copies to AHC.
  • UARK Faculty of all standing are encouraged to apply.
  • Indexing costs are not eligible for the grant

The AHC encourages a broad definition of the humanities that adheres to that specified by the National Foundation of the Arts and Humanities Act, which defines humanities as including, but not limited to “the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of the social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life.”

Interested parties should provide proposal for the project including:

  • A proposal of no more than 500 words including:
    • title and a description of the work
    • importance or contribution
    • a statement on how the funds would be used to aid publication or distribution
    • word count of manuscript along with image, table, and map count
    • timeline for production of the work
  • A current curriculum vita
  • A letter of commitment from the publisher and budget justification.
  • A statement on current RIF funds balance

Review of proposals will begin in March 1, 2021

For further information, please contact the UAHC Director Tricia Starks, Associate Director Lissette Lopez Szwydky-Davis, or a member of the UAHC steering committee.

FA2020

Assistant Professor Alison Place, of the Graphic Design department, has received a publication subvention grant for visuals for her book, Feminist Design: Designing for Equity, Inclusion and Allyship, which is under contract with MIT Press. The book draws on intersectional feminist theory to confront the patriarchal origins of design culture, open new spaces for critical making and inquiry, and establish innovative methods and ways of designing to counter discrimination and systemic oppression.

These grants will support humanities research by undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty into systemic racism, past and present. The selection committee will award two grants for undergraduates, two for graduate students, and two for faculty (of all ranks) at $1,000 each. Because research travel is currently prohibited, funds can be used for research materials, equipment, or other approved, research-related expenses.  The successful project will include a research deliverable such as a scholarly article, essay for print or electronic publications, or other field-specific research-based product.

The UAHC encourages a broad definition of the humanities that adheres to that specified by the National Foundation of the Arts and Humanities Act, which defines humanities as including, but not limited to “the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of the social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life.”

  • Funds must be used for research expenses (not salary replacement) and can include materials, equipment, or other approved items.
  • A research deliverable for either academic or popular consumption must be specified with a timeline.
  • Funds must be used w/in 2 years.
  • Awardees will acknowledge UAHC in all publications and provide copies.

Interested parties should provide a proposal with:

  • A narrative of the project of no more than 1000 words including:
    • title and description of the project
    • work plan and intended research deliverable with timeline
    • qualifications for the project
  • A curriculum vita
  • A detailed budget

Review of proposals will begin October 31, 2020  

For further information, please contact the UAHC Director Tricia Starks, Associate Director Lissette Lopez Szwydky-Davis, or a member of the UAHC steering committee.

FACULTY RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENTS

Assistant Professor Manuel Olmedo Gobante of the Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures will use his grant funding for the preparation and eventual publication of a translation and critical edition of a seventeenth century play by Andrés de Claramonte (c. 1580-1626).  The play -- The Valiant Black Man in Flanders – was extremely popular and its importance reverberated into later centuries. The end product -- a bilingual critical edition -- will be valuable across disciplines and will shed light on the silenced and marginalized early history of Black resistance to systemic racism.

With the project, “Structural Racism and Black Place Making: An Arkansas Story Rooted in a Legacy of Transgenerational Family Resilience,” Professor Valandra of the School of Social Work and the African and African American Studies program, traces the historical and contemporary intersections of systemic racism and Black placemaking. Using the transgenerational family journey of four generations of Black Arkansan women, Professor Valandra will create a compelling story of Black agency and resilience in the face of trauma and systemic barriers, which she will release in public talks, publications, and conference presentations. Dr. LaShawnda Fields, assistant professor in the School of Social Work will assist with the data collection, data analysis, and development of the manuscripts.

GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENTS

Neba Evans is a masters students in Journalism working in the field of documentary film production. Her project, “A Song of the Bluff” will highlight the history of Pine Bluff Arkansas in a short documentary film that flips the narratives of historical trauma to share stories of a thriving, hope-filled community. Using the creation of a city history exhibition as the backbone, the documentary incorporates film, history, art, and music to address the roots of inequality in Pine Bluff and Arkansas more generally.

The project “Whiteness in the early 18c Louisiana and Orinoco,” from Guillermo Pupo Pernet of the Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies program, brings together cartography with history, literature, power, discussions of whiteness, and the geography of the Caribbean from 1670-1770. Looking at the interplay between the French and Spanish empires, and utilizing techniques from Africana and Indigenous studies, Pupo Pernet intends to submit this work as an article as he completes his dissertation. 

These grants will support humanities research by undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty into systemic racism, past and present, at the University of Arkansas. The selection committee will award four grants for undergraduates, four for graduate students, and four for faculty (of all ranks) at $1,000 each. The committee reserves the right to award more in any one category depending upon the received proposals. The successful project will include a research deliverable such as a scholarly article, essay for print or electronic publications, or other field-specific research-based product. 

The AHC encourages a broad definition of the humanities that adheres to that specified by the National Foundation of the Arts and Humanities Act, which defines humanities as including, but not limited to “the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of the social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life.”

  • Funds must be used for research expenses (not salary replacement) and can include materials, equipment, or other approved items.
  • A research deliverable for either academic or popular consumption must be specified with a timeline.
  • Funds must be used w/in 2 years.
  • Awardees will acknowledge UAHC in all publications and provide copies.

Interested parties should provide a proposal with:

  • A narrative of the project of no more than 1000 words including:
    • title and description of the project
    • work plan and intended research deliverable with timeline
    • qualifications for the project
  • A curriculum vita
  • A detailed budget

Proposals should be sent directly to tstarks@uark.edu with the subject line "Research grants."

Review of proposals will begin September 15, 2020  

For further information, please contact the UAHC Director Tricia Starks, Associate Director Lissette Lopez Szwydky-Davis, or a member of the UAHC steering committee.

FACULTY AWARDEES

 **Professors T. Jake Dionne and Joe Hatfield of the Department of Communication will use webscraping, rhetorical analysis, and interviews for their project – “#BlackatUARK: Public Memories of Anti-Black Racism on Campus.” This research will contextualize the Twitter moment of #BlackatUARK against the background of students, faculty, and staff confronting anti-Black racism on college campuses throughout the United States. They anticipate sharing their research product with colleagues at the National Communication Association meeting and the University of Arkansas System Task Force on Racial Equality. They will also pursue a scholarly publication and a piece for the popular press. 

**Professor Brittany N. Hearne from the Department of Sociology and Criminology, and affiliate faculty in African and African American Studies, will use surveys and interviews with Black people in the NWA area and at the University of Arkansas to investigate the impact of social distancing practices in the region on feelings of community and their effects for mental health during the COVID-19 crisis. Respondents will be asked to share their thoughts about how race, gender, and socioeconomic class shaped their lives during the pandemic. Along with her co-investigator, Professor Brandon Jackson, she will produce a manuscript for publication in a scholarly journal.

 **Professors Valandra and Caree Banton, joint appointments in the African and African American Studies and in the School of Social Work and Department of History, respectively, will pursue a project to encourage humanities research on race in Washington county and at the University of Arkansas by regional secondary school students. They are joined by English doctoral student Katie Powell. This grant, along with their work on the Washington County Community Remembrance Project, is an important effort fulfilling the land-grant mission of the university, engaging future students, and increasing the profile in the region of university-driven humanities research.

GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDEES 

**Michael Anthony, a doctoral student in the Department of History, will be using his grant to research the Catcher Race Riot of 1923 with materials from the University of Arkansas special collections and regional archives and in interviews with survivors and their descendants. His larger analysis will engage the racial clashes and extrajudicial killings that characterized the river valley and northwest Arkansas in the early twentieth century and continue to influence views on the region today. He will use this research to develop an article for an academic journal.

**Whitney King, a master’s student in the School of Journalism and Strategic Media, will pursue research to showcase the stories of members of the University of Arkansas community from Black, Indigenous, and other historically underrepresented groups who have made significant contributions towards creating a more inclusive and diverse campus environment. Working with the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History’s “Groundbreakers and Path Makers” project, King will conduct and record oral interviews that will further not just for her own research but that will be available to aid other researchers interested in the history of the University.

UNDERGRADUATE AWARDEES

**Erica Tempesta is completing a bachelor’s degree in nursing in the Elanor Mann School of Nursing. Her project is to investigate how ethics education among nursing students, as taught at the University of Arkansas and in schools around the United States, can be used to fight racial disparities in health care provision. She will use this research to produce papers for conferences in medical humanities and nursing.

**Daniel Webster is pursuing an honors degree in sociology along with majors in psychology and criminology. For his research project he intends to conduct in-depth interviews to find out how multiracial and biracial identities affect feelings of belonging among students at the University of Arkansas. Highlighting gender theorists’ work on intersectional identities, he hopes to understand how race and gender shape how students view and interact with the college environment. He will pursue a publication with his advisor Professor Brittany N. Hearne.

These grants will provide co-sponsorships of up to $2000 for a research or a teaching workshop on including anti-racist content and theory in humanities scholarship or creating diverse and inclusive humanities curriculum. Workshops should be open to online content and interdisciplinary in focus.

The AHC encourages a broad definition of the humanities that adheres to that specified by the National Foundation of the Arts and Humanities Act, which defines humanities as including, but not limited to “the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of the social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life.” 

Interested parties should provide a proposal with:

  • A description of the event of no more than 500 words including:
    • title and description of the workshop including intended outcomes
    • requested amount of support
    • constituencies served (department, university, community)
    • publicity plan for event
  • A detailed budget

Program details are the responsibility of event organizers. The AHC does not have dedicated staff. If the AHC funds our event organizers agree to the following:

  • We will acknowledge AHC support in introductions to the event.
  • We will include either the graphic identifier or the name of the center on publicity.
  • We will keep the AHC director informed to allow coordinated publicity. 

Proposals should be sent directly to tstarks@uark.edu with the subject line "workshop grants."

Review of proposals will begin September 15, 2020

For further information, please contact the UAHC Director Tricia Starks, Associate Director Lissette Lopez Szwydky-Davis, or a member of the UAHC steering committee.

The project “Advancing Intersectional Racial Justice at a Predominantly White Institution through Interdisciplinary Dialogues and the Formation of Learning Communities” is a series of several workshops being organized by Professors Colleen Thurston of the School of Journalism and Strategic Media and Injeong Yoon-Ramierez of Art Education. Bringing together faculty from over a dozen departments, programs, and centers at the University of Arkansas, this series of workshops will deepen and strengthen the current conversations around campus on diversity, inclusion, and how to create long-term sustainable changes in curriculum, teaching, and research practices across and beyond humanities programs.

 

Professor John Walch of the Department of Theater will organize an interdisciplinary, multi-day workshop on “Hip-Hop Theater: History, Critique, Practice, and Performance.” Elements of this workshop will appeal to faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students from over half a dozen programs across campus by virtually bringing in experts from off campus -- Hip-Hop theatre artists Idris Goodwin and Kevin Coval – to discuss their craft’s history and practice. A hip-hop performance featuring work generated during the workshop and performed by Department of Theater students and broadcast through the Department of Theater’s online platform, will cap the experience.