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Geffrey Michael Davis

Geffrey Michael Davis

Assoc Professor

J. William Fulbright College of Arts & Sciences

(ENGL)-English

Phone: 479-575-4801

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Geffrey Davis is the author of two full-length collections of poetry: Night Angler, winner of the 2018 James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets, and Revising the Storm, winner of the 2013 A. Poulin Jr. Poetry Prize. He is also the author of the chapbook Begotten, co-written with F. Douglas Brown. His poems have been published in Crazyhorse, Mississippi Review, New England Review, New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, PBS NewsHour, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. Named a finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, Davis has received the Anne Halley Poetry Prize, the Dogwood Prize in Poetry, and the Wabash Prize for Poetry, as well as fellowships from Bread Loaf, Cave Canem, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Vermont Studio Center. He was also awarded a Public Engagment Fellowship from the Whiting Foundation for his work with The Prison Story Project. A native of the Pacific Northwest, Davis also teaches for The Rainier Writing Workshop, Pacific Lutheran University's low-residency MFA program.

NIGHT ANGLER  (BOA Editions, 2019)
Geffrey Davis’s second collection of poems reads as an evolving love letter and meditation on what it means to raise an American family. In poems that express a deep sense of gratitude and wonder, Davis delivers a heart-strong prayer that longs for home, for safety for black lives, and for the messy success of breaking through the trauma of growing up during the crack epidemic to create a new model of fatherhood. Filled with humor and tenderness, Night Angler sings its own version of a song called grace—sung with a heavy and hopeful mix of inherited notes and discovered chords.

 

REVISING THE STORM  (BOA Editions, 2014)
This debut collection by Cave Canem fellow Geffrey Davis burrows under the surface of gender, addiction, recovery, clumsy love, bitterness, and faith. The tones explored—tender, comic, wry, tragic—interrogate male subjectivity and privilege, as they examine their “embarrassed desires” for familial connection, sexual love, compassion, and repair. Revising the Storm also speaks to the sons and daughters affected by the drug/crack epidemic of the ’80s and addresses issues of masculinity and its importance in family.